Difference between revisions of "Francis J Child"

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'''Section Editor: Steve Gardham'''
+
== The Child Ballads ==
  
  
The work of Frances J Child had been the subject of much discourse and there are many web sites dealing with the ballads he assembled.
+
The main thrust of this section of Folkopedia is to engender long overdue dialogue on what for the last century and more have come to be known as Child Ballads, i.e, the compilation, analysis and publication of ‘The English and Scottish Popular Ballads’ by Professor F J Child between the years 1882 and 1898. I am convinced in publishing this work he intended it to be a guide for students, and to open a debate on the ballads. Unfortunately what followed was that it rapidly became revered and was given biblical status amongst scholars, particularly in the United States, almost as if it was set in stone, despite the fact that Child himself had serious misgivings about the veracity of many of the ballads. In Britain where most of the ballads originated they continued to be treated like any other ballads, i.e., British collectors post Child published these ballads randomly amongst the many broadside ballads they were finding without giving them any special status. However when Cecil Sharp started collecting songs in America the results were published in 1917 with the Child ballads given prominence at the beginning of the collection and for the next half century this set the standard for most American ballad anthologies, the eventual format which evolved being in 3 sections, Child ballads, British broadside ballads and native American ballads.
  
The purpose of this section is:
 
#  to present a different and probably controversial set of opinions
 
# to link to work already done
 
# to enable further discussion
 
  
 +
Child was well aware that a large slice of what he published had at best been interfered with by literary hands, and at worst some, he had suspicions, were blatant forgeries. He strove to minimize this by, where possible, going back to manuscripts rather than published versions, but even then he was aware that even some of the manuscripts were also suspect, some of them being little more than prepared proofs prior to publication.
 +
 +
 +
Therefore what we propose here is a separate online discussion document on each ballad where scarce, early and seminal versions can be posted, where interested parties can enter into dialogue giving fact and opinion on the veracity of individual ballads and indeed individual versions. Obviously much information unavailable to or missed by Child has come to light in the last century and new discoveries are being made even today. For instance Child never got to see the Peter Buchan manuscripts now housed at Harvard which arrived there shortly after his death. Had he seen them it would have probably hardened his views against these versions as all the extensive manuscripts consist of is the hand-written proof ready for publication plus those ballads and songs deemed unsuitable for final publication in Ancient Ballads of the North. In fact nothing resembling any field collection notes of any sort, if they ever existed, have survived from Buchan’s prestigious output.
 +
 +
 +
Apart from separate pages for each ballad we propose to include sections where debate can take place on the interference of the collectors/antiquarians and other issues as they arise on the ballads in general. For instance there have often been other ballads suggested, such as ‘Craigieston’ (The Trees They Do Grow High) that Child might have included had he been aware of them, and these can be debated here.
 +
 +
 +
It has also been proposed that we include space to examine more modern interpretations of the ballads. During what is known in Britain as the Second Revival (1950s onwards) there have been many interesting attempts to re-interpret and adapt the Child Ballads, notably by Ewan MacColl and Bert Lloyd. I here suggest separate pages for these discussions as the two issues of literary intervention and modern interpretation are separate issues and it could be confusing to debate these at the same time.
 +
 +
 +
To get things off the ground, and with so many ballads to go at, I am suggesting we look at a number of ballads with which there are more obvious interesting and contentious issues such as 20 The Cruel Mother, 264 The White Fisher, 293 John of Hazelgreen and 295 The Brown Girl. A useful starting point for debate on many of the ballads is Child’s own comments and at the earliest opportunity I will enter these.
 +
 +
 +
Steve Gardham
  
  
Line 19: Line 31:
 
* 5: Gil Brenton
 
* 5: Gil Brenton
 
* 6: Willie's Lady
 
* 6: Willie's Lady
* 7: Earl Brand
+
* [[7: Earl Brand]]**[[Child 7 Comment|Editorial]]
* 8: Erlinton
+
* [[8: Erlinton]]**[[Child 8 Comment|Editorial]]
 
* 9: The Fair Flower of Northumberland
 
* 9: The Fair Flower of Northumberland
 
* 10: The Twa Sisters
 
* 10: The Twa Sisters
Line 27: Line 39:
 
* 13: Edward
 
* 13: Edward
 
* 14: Babylon or The Bonnie Banks o Fordie
 
* 14: Babylon or The Bonnie Banks o Fordie
* 15: [[Leesom Brand]] ** [[Child 15/16 Comment|Editorial]]
+
* [[15: Leesom Brand]] ** [[Child 15/16 Comment|Editorial]]
* 16: [[Sheath and Knife]] ** [[Child 15/16 Comment|Editorial]]
+
* [[16: Sheath and Knife]] ** [[Child 15/16 Comment|Editorial]]
 
* 17: Hind Horn
 
* 17: Hind Horn
 
* 18: Sir Lionel
 
* 18: Sir Lionel
 
* 19: King Orfeo
 
* 19: King Orfeo
* 20: [[Cruel Mother,The|The Cruel Mother]] ** [[Child 20 Comment|Editorial]]
+
* [[20: Cruel Mother,The|The Cruel Mother]] ** [[Child 20 Comment|Editorial]]
 
* 21: The Maid and the Palmer
 
* 21: The Maid and the Palmer
 
* 22: St. Stephen and Herod
 
* 22: St. Stephen and Herod
Line 133: Line 145:
 
* 115: Robyn and Gandeleyn
 
* 115: Robyn and Gandeleyn
 
* 116: Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough and William of Cloudesly
 
* 116: Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough and William of Cloudesly
* 117: A Gest of Robyn Hode
+
==[[Introduction to the Robin Hood Ballads]]==
* 118: Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne
+
* [[117: A Gest of Robyn Hode]]**[[Child 117 Comment|Editorial]]
* 119: Robin Hood and the Monk
+
* [[118: Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne]]**[[Child 118 Comment|Editorial]]
* 120: Robin Hood's Death
+
* [[119: Robin Hood and the Monk]]**[[Child 119 Comment|Editorial]]
* 121: Robin Hood and the Potter
+
* [[120: Robin Hood's Death]]**[[Child 120 Comment|Editorial]]
* 122: Robin Hood and the Butcher
+
* [[121: Robin Hood and the Potter]]**[[Child 121 Comment|Editorial]]
* 123: Robin Hood and the Curtal Friar
+
* [[122: Robin Hood and the Butcher]]**[[Child 122 Comment|Editorial]]
* 124: The Jolly Pinder of Wakefield
+
* [[123: Robin Hood and the Curtal Friar]]**[[Child 123 Comment|Editorial]]
* 125: Robin Hood and Little John
+
* [[124: The Jolly Pinder of Wakefield]]**[[Child 124 Comment|Editorial]]
* 126: Robin Hood and the Tanner
+
* [[125: Robin Hood and Little John]]**[[Child 125 Comment|Editorial]]
* 127: Robin Hood and the Tinker
+
* [[126: Robin Hood and the Tanner]]**[[Child 126 Comment|Editorial]]
* 128: Robin Hood and the Newly Revived
+
* [[127: Robin Hood and the Tinker]]**[[Child 127 Comment|Editorial]]
* 129: Robin Hood and the Prince of Aragon
+
* [[128: Robin Hood Newly Revived]]**[[Child 128 Comment|Editorial]]
* 130: Robin Hood and the Scotchman
+
* [[129: Robin Hood and the Prince of Aragon]]**[[Child 129 Comment|Editorial]]
* 131: Robin Hood and the Ranger
+
* [[130: Robin Hood and the Scotchman]]**[[Child 130 Comment|Editorial]]
* 132: The Bold Pedlar and Robin Hood
+
* [[131: Robin Hood and the Ranger]]**[[Child 131 Comment|Editorial]]
* 133: Robin Hood and the Beggar, I
+
* [[132: The Bold Pedlar and Robin Hood]]**[[Child 132 Comment|Editorial]]
* 134: Robin Hood and the Beggar, II
+
* [[133: Robin Hood and the Beggar, I]]**[[Child 133 Comment|Editorial]]
* 135: Robin Hood and the Shepherd
+
* [[134: Robin Hood and the Beggar, II]]**[[Child 134 Comment|Editorial]]
* 136: Robin Hood's Delight
+
* [[135: Robin Hood and the Shepherd]]**[[Child 135 Comment|Editorial]]
* 137: Robin Hood and the Pedlars
+
* [[136: Robin Hood's Delight]]**[[Child 136 Comment|Editorial]]
* 138: Robin Hood and Allen a Dale
+
* [[137: Robin Hood and the Pedlars]]**[[Child 137 Comment|Editorial]]
* 139: Robin Hood's Progress to Nottingham
+
* [[138: Robin Hood and Allen a Dale]]**[[Child 138 Comment|Editorial]]
* 140: Robin Hood Rescuing Three Squires
+
* [[139: Robin Hood's Progress to Nottingham]]**[[Child 139 Comment|Editorial]]
* 141: Robin Hood Rescuing Will Stutly
+
* [[140: Robin Hood Rescuing Three Squires]]**[[Child 140 Comment|Editorial]]
* 142: Little John a Begging
+
* [[141: Robin Hood Rescuing Will Stutly]]**[[Child 141 Comment|Editorial]]
* 143: Robin Hood and the Bishop
+
* [[142: Little John a Begging]]**[[Child 142 Comment|Editorial]]
* 144: Robin Hood and the Bishop of Hereford
+
* [[143: Robin Hood and the Bishop]]**[[Child 143 Comment|Editorial]]
* 145: Robin Hood and Queen Katherine
+
* [[144: Robin Hood and the Bishop of Hereford]]**[[Child 144 Comment|Editorial]]
* 146: Robin Hood's Chase
+
* [[145: Robin Hood and Queen Katherine]]**[[Child 145 Comment|Editorial]]
* 147: Robin Hood's Golden Prize
+
* [[146: Robin Hood's Chase]]**[[Child 146 Comment|Editorial]]
* 148: The Noble Fisherman or Robin Hood's Preferment
+
* [[147: Robin Hood's Golden Prize]]**[[Child 147 Comment|Editorial]]
* 149: Robin Hood's Birth, Breeding, Valor and Marriage
+
* [[148: The Noble Fisherman or Robin Hood's Preferment]]**[[Child 148 Comment|Editorial]]
* 150: Robin Hood and Maid Marian
+
* [[149: Robin Hood's Birth, Breeding, Valor and Marriage]]**[[Child 149 Comment|Editorial]]
* 151: The King's Disguise, and Friendship with Robin Hood
+
* [[150: Robin Hood and Maid Marian]]**[[Child 150 Comment|Editorial]]
* 152: Robin Hood and the Golden Arrow
+
* [[151: The King's Disguise, and Friendship with Robin Hood]]**[[Child 151 Comment|Editorial]]
* 153: Robin Hood and the Valiant Knight
+
* [[152: Robin Hood and the Golden Arrow]]**[[Child 152 Comment|Editorial]]
* 154: A True Tale of Robin Hood
+
* [[153: Robin Hood and the Valiant Knight]]**[[Child 153 Comment|Editorial]]
 +
* [[154: A True Tale of Robin Hood]]**[[Child 154 Comment|Editorial]]
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 
* 155: Sir Hugh, or the Jew's Daughter
 
* 155: Sir Hugh, or the Jew's Daughter
 
* 156: Queen Eleanor's Confession
 
* 156: Queen Eleanor's Confession
Line 205: Line 221:
 
* 187: Jock o the Side
 
* 187: Jock o the Side
 
* 188: Archie o Cawfield
 
* 188: Archie o Cawfield
+
 
 
 
===Volume IV: 189-265===
 
===Volume IV: 189-265===
 
* 189: Hobie Noble
 
* 189: Hobie Noble
Line 228: Line 243:
 
* 207: Lord Delamere
 
* 207: Lord Delamere
 
* 208: Lord Dernwentwater
 
* 208: Lord Dernwentwater
* 209: Geordie
+
* [[209: Geordie]]**[[Child 209 Comment|Editorial]]
 
* 210: Bonnie James Campbell
 
* 210: Bonnie James Campbell
 
* 211: Bewick and Graham
 
* 211: Bewick and Graham
Line 315: Line 330:
 
* 291: Child Owlet
 
* 291: Child Owlet
 
* 292: The West-Country Damosel's Complaint
 
* 292: The West-Country Damosel's Complaint
* 293: John of Hazelgreen
+
* [[293: John of Hazelgreen]]**[[Child 293 Comment|Editorial]]
 
* 294: Dugal Quin
 
* 294: Dugal Quin
* 295: The Brown Girl
+
* [[295: The Brown Girl]]**[[Child 295 Comment|Editorial]]
 
* 296: Walter Lesly
 
* 296: Walter Lesly
 
* 297: Earl Rothes
 
* 297: Earl Rothes

Latest revision as of 01:12, 22 March 2009

The Child Ballads

The main thrust of this section of Folkopedia is to engender long overdue dialogue on what for the last century and more have come to be known as Child Ballads, i.e, the compilation, analysis and publication of ‘The English and Scottish Popular Ballads’ by Professor F J Child between the years 1882 and 1898. I am convinced in publishing this work he intended it to be a guide for students, and to open a debate on the ballads. Unfortunately what followed was that it rapidly became revered and was given biblical status amongst scholars, particularly in the United States, almost as if it was set in stone, despite the fact that Child himself had serious misgivings about the veracity of many of the ballads. In Britain where most of the ballads originated they continued to be treated like any other ballads, i.e., British collectors post Child published these ballads randomly amongst the many broadside ballads they were finding without giving them any special status. However when Cecil Sharp started collecting songs in America the results were published in 1917 with the Child ballads given prominence at the beginning of the collection and for the next half century this set the standard for most American ballad anthologies, the eventual format which evolved being in 3 sections, Child ballads, British broadside ballads and native American ballads.


Child was well aware that a large slice of what he published had at best been interfered with by literary hands, and at worst some, he had suspicions, were blatant forgeries. He strove to minimize this by, where possible, going back to manuscripts rather than published versions, but even then he was aware that even some of the manuscripts were also suspect, some of them being little more than prepared proofs prior to publication.


Therefore what we propose here is a separate online discussion document on each ballad where scarce, early and seminal versions can be posted, where interested parties can enter into dialogue giving fact and opinion on the veracity of individual ballads and indeed individual versions. Obviously much information unavailable to or missed by Child has come to light in the last century and new discoveries are being made even today. For instance Child never got to see the Peter Buchan manuscripts now housed at Harvard which arrived there shortly after his death. Had he seen them it would have probably hardened his views against these versions as all the extensive manuscripts consist of is the hand-written proof ready for publication plus those ballads and songs deemed unsuitable for final publication in Ancient Ballads of the North. In fact nothing resembling any field collection notes of any sort, if they ever existed, have survived from Buchan’s prestigious output.


Apart from separate pages for each ballad we propose to include sections where debate can take place on the interference of the collectors/antiquarians and other issues as they arise on the ballads in general. For instance there have often been other ballads suggested, such as ‘Craigieston’ (The Trees They Do Grow High) that Child might have included had he been aware of them, and these can be debated here.


It has also been proposed that we include space to examine more modern interpretations of the ballads. During what is known in Britain as the Second Revival (1950s onwards) there have been many interesting attempts to re-interpret and adapt the Child Ballads, notably by Ewan MacColl and Bert Lloyd. I here suggest separate pages for these discussions as the two issues of literary intervention and modern interpretation are separate issues and it could be confusing to debate these at the same time.


To get things off the ground, and with so many ballads to go at, I am suggesting we look at a number of ballads with which there are more obvious interesting and contentious issues such as 20 The Cruel Mother, 264 The White Fisher, 293 John of Hazelgreen and 295 The Brown Girl. A useful starting point for debate on many of the ballads is Child’s own comments and at the earliest opportunity I will enter these.


Steve Gardham


Volume I: 1-53

  • 1: Riddles Wisely Expounded
  • 2: The Elfin Knight
  • 3: The Fause Knight on the Road
  • 4: Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight
  • 5: Gil Brenton
  • 6: Willie's Lady
  • 7: Earl Brand**Editorial
  • 8: Erlinton**Editorial
  • 9: The Fair Flower of Northumberland
  • 10: The Twa Sisters
  • 11: The Cruel Brother
  • 12: Lord Rendal
  • 13: Edward
  • 14: Babylon or The Bonnie Banks o Fordie
  • 15: Leesom Brand ** Editorial
  • 16: Sheath and Knife ** Editorial
  • 17: Hind Horn
  • 18: Sir Lionel
  • 19: King Orfeo
  • The Cruel Mother ** Editorial
  • 21: The Maid and the Palmer
  • 22: St. Stephen and Herod
  • 23: Judas
  • 24: Bonnie Annie
  • 25: Willie's Lyke-Wake
  • 26: The Three Ravens
  • 27: The Whummil Bore
  • 28: Burd Ellen and Young Tamlane
  • 29: The Boy and the Mantle
  • 30: King Arthur and King Cornwall
  • 31: The Marriage of Sir Gawain
  • 32: King Henry
  • 33: Kempy Kay
  • 34: Kemp Owyne
  • 35: Allison Gross
  • 36: The Laily Worm and the Machrel of the Sea
  • 37: Thomas Rymer
  • 39: Tam Lin
  • 40: The Queen of Elfan's Nourice
  • 41: Hind Etin
  • 42: Clerk Colvill
  • 43: The Broomfield Hill
  • 44: The Two Magicians
  • 45: King John and the Bishop
  • 46: Captain Wedderburn's Courtship
  • 47: Proud Lady Margaret
  • 48: Young Andrew
  • 49: The Twa Brothers
  • 50: The Bonny Hind
  • 51: Lizie Wan
  • 52: The King's Dochter Lady Jean
  • 53: Young Beichan

Volume II: 54-113

  • 54: The Cherry-Tree Carol
  • 55: The Carnal and the Crane
  • 56: Dives and Lazarus
  • 57: Brown Robyn's Confession
  • 58: Sir Patrick Spens
  • 59: Sir Aldingar
  • 60: King Estmere
  • 61: Sir Cawline
  • 62: Fair Annie
  • 63: Child Waters
  • 64: Fair Janet
  • 65: Lady Maisry
  • 66: Lord Ingram and Chiel Wyet
  • 67: Glasgerion
  • 68: Young Hunting
  • 69: Clerk Sanders
  • 70: Willie and Lady Maisry
  • 71: The Bent Sae Brown
  • 72: The Clerk's Twa Sons o Owensford
  • 73: Lord Thomas and Annet
  • 74: Fair Margaret and Sweet William
  • 75: Lord Lovel
  • 76: The Lass of Roch Royal
  • 77: Sweet William's Ghost
  • 78: The Unquiet Grave
  • 79: The Wife of Usher's Well
  • 80: Old Robin of Portingale
  • 81: Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard
  • 82: The Bonny Birdy
  • 83: Child Maurice
  • 84: Bonny Barbara Allen
  • 85: Lady Alice
  • 86: Young Benjie
  • 87: Prince Robert
  • 88: Young Johnstone
  • 89: Fause Foodrage
  • 90: Jellon Grame
  • 91: Fair Mary of Wallington
  • 92: Bonny Bee Hom
  • 93: Lamkin
  • 94: Young Waters
  • 95: The Maid Freed From the Gallows
  • 96: The Gay Goshawk
  • 97: Brown Robin
  • 98: Brown Adam
  • 99: Johnie Scott
  • 100: Willie o Winesberry
  • 101: Willie o Couglas Dale
  • 102: Willie and Earl Richard's Daughter
  • 103: Rose the Red and White LIly
  • 104: Prince Heathen
  • 105: The Bailiff's Daughter of Islington
  • 106: The Famous Flower of Serving Men
  • 107: Will Steward and John
  • 108: Christopher White
  • 109: Tom Potts
  • 110: The Knight and the Shepherd's Daughter
  • 111: Crow and Pie
  • 112: Blow Away the Morning Dew
  • 113: The Great Silkie of Sule Skerry


Volume III: 114-188

  • 114: Johnie Cock
  • 115: Robyn and Gandeleyn
  • 116: Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough and William of Cloudesly

Introduction to the Robin Hood Ballads


  • 155: Sir Hugh, or the Jew's Daughter
  • 156: Queen Eleanor's Confession
  • 157: Gude Wallace
  • 158: High Spencer's Feats in France
  • 159: Durham Field
  • 160: The Knight of Liddesdale
  • 161: The Battle of Otterburn
  • 162: The Hunting of the Cheviot
  • 163: The Battle of Harlaw
  • 164: King Henry Fifth's Conquest of France
  • 165: Sir John Butler
  • 166: The Rose of England
  • 167: Andrew Bartin
  • 168: Flodden Field
  • 169: Johnie Armstrong
  • 170: The Death of Queen Jane
  • 171: Thomas Cromwell
  • 172: Musselburgh Field
  • 173: Mary Hamilton
  • 174: Earl Bothwell
  • 175: The Rising in the North
  • 176: Northumberland Betrayed by Douglas
  • 177: The Earl of Westmoreland
  • 178: Captain Car, or, Edom o Gordon
  • 179: Rookhope Ryde
  • 180: King James and Brown
  • 181: The Bonnie Earl o' Moray
  • 182: The Laird o Logie
  • 183: Willie Macintosh
  • 184: The Lads of Wamphray
  • 185: Dick o the Cow
  • 186: Kinmont Willie
  • 187: Jock o the Side
  • 188: Archie o Cawfield

Volume IV: 189-265

  • 189: Hobie Noble
  • 190: Jamie Telfer of the Fair Dodhead
  • 191: Hughie Graham
  • 192: The Lochmaben Harper
  • 193: The Death of Parcy Reed
  • 194: The Laird of Wariston
  • 195: Lord Maxwell's Last Goodnight
  • 196: The Fire of Frendraught
  • 197: James Grant
  • 198: Bonny John Seton
  • 199: Bonnie House o' Airlie
  • 200: The Gypsy Laddie
  • 201: Bessy Bell and Mary Gray
  • 202: The Battle of Philiphaugh
  • 203: The Baron of Brackley
  • 204: Jamie Douglas
  • 205: Loudon Hill, or Dromclog
  • 206: Bothwell Bridge
  • 207: Lord Delamere
  • 208: Lord Dernwentwater
  • 209: Geordie**Editorial
  • 210: Bonnie James Campbell
  • 211: Bewick and Graham
  • 212: The Duke of Athole's Nurse
  • 213: Sir James the Rose
  • 214: The Braes o Yarrow
  • 215: Rare Willie Drowned in Yarrow, or, The Water o Gamrie
  • 216: The Mother's Malison, or, Clyde's Water
  • 217: The Broom of Cowdenknows
  • 218: The False Lover Won Back
  • 219: The Gardener
  • 220: The Bonny Lass of Anglesey
  • 221: Katherine Jafray
  • 222: Bonny Baby Livingston
  • 223: Epie Morrie
  • 224: The Lady of Arngosk
  • 225: Rob Roy
  • 226: Lizie Lindsay
  • 227: Bonny Lizie Baillie
  • 228: Glasgow Peggie
  • 229: Earl Crawford
  • 230: The Slaughter of the Laird of Mellerstain
  • 231: The Earl of Errol
  • 232: Richie Story
  • 233: Andrew Lammie
  • 234: Charlie MacPherson
  • 235: The Earl of Aboyne
  • 236: The Laird o Drum
  • 237: The Duke of Gordon's Daughter
  • 238: Glenlogie or Jean o Bethalnie
  • 239: Lord Saltoun and Auchanachie
  • 240: The Rantin Laddie
  • 241: The Baron o Leys
  • 242: The Coble o Cargin
  • 243: James Harris, (The Daemon Lover)
  • 244: James Hatley
  • 245: Young Allan
  • 246: Redesdale and Wise William
  • 247: Lady Elspat
  • 248: The Grey Cock, or, Saw You My Father
  • 249: Auld Matrons
  • 250: Henry Martyn
  • 251: Lang Johnny More
  • 252: The Kitchie-Boy
  • 253: Thomas o Yonderdale
  • 254: Lord William, or Lord Lundy
  • 255: Willie's Fatal Visit
  • 256: Alison and Willie
  • 257: Burd Isabel and Earl Patrick
  • 258: Broughty Wa's
  • 259: Lord Thomas Stuart
  • 260: Lord Thomas and Lady Margaret
  • 261: Lady Isabel
  • 262: Lord Livingston
  • 263: The New-Slain Knight
  • 264: The White Fisher
  • 265: The Knight's Ghost


Volume V: 266-305

  • 266: John Thomson and the Turk
  • 267: The Heir of Linne
  • 268: The Twa Knights
  • 269: Lady Diamond
  • 270: The Earl of Mar's Daughter
  • 271: The Lord of Lorn and the False Steward
  • 272: The Suffolk Miracle
  • 273: King Edward the Fourth and a Tanner of Tamworth
  • 274: Our Goodman
  • 275: Get Up and Bar the Door
  • 276: TheFriar in the Well
  • 277: The Wife Wrapt in Wether's Skin
  • 278: The Farmer's Curst Wife
  • 279: The Jolly Beggar
  • 280: The Beggar-Laddie
  • 281: The Keach I the Creel
  • 282: Jock the Leg and the Merry Merchant
  • 283: The Crafty Farmer
  • 284: John Dory
  • 285: The George Aloe and the Sweepstake
  • 286: The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity)
  • 287: Captain Ward and the Rainbow
  • 288: The Young Earl of Essex's Victory Over the Emperor of Germany
  • 289: The Mermaid
  • 290: The Wylie Wife of the Hie Toun Hie
  • 291: Child Owlet
  • 292: The West-Country Damosel's Complaint
  • 293: John of Hazelgreen**Editorial
  • 294: Dugal Quin
  • 295: The Brown Girl**Editorial
  • 296: Walter Lesly
  • 297: Earl Rothes
  • 298: Young Peggy
  • 299: Trooper and Maid
  • 300: Blancheflour and Jellyflorice
  • 301: The Queen of Scotland
  • 302: Young Bearwell
  • 303: The Holy Nunnery
  • 304: Young Ronald
  • 305: The Outlaw Murray