Take 6 Transcription Programme: The Butterworth Archive, MS 6b

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GB/6b/1 All Round My Hat Version 1 of 2

File:GB-6b-1.mid

File:GB-6b-1.pdf

File:GB-6b-1.xml

abc notation

X:1
T:GB/6a/1 All Round My Hat Version 1 of 3
C:Sung by Mr. Edmund Knight, Washington, December 1907
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:1. Come all you young people,
W: and listen to my ditty,
W: I'll tell you how young Phoebe
W: accused young William wrong;
W: She said he had deceived her,
W: it sadly seemed to grieve her.
W: Left alone one evening
W: she sang a mournful song.
W:
W: 2. "Young men are false,
W: they are so deceitful,
W: "Young men are false,
W: they seldom do prove true;
W: "Rambling and ranging,
W: their minds are always changing,
W: "They are always seeking
W: for some young girl that's new.
W:
W: 3. "Many a long hour
W: have I spent in courting,
W: "Many a long hour
W: have I spent in vain;
W: "But since it is my fortune
W: that I must die a maiden,
W: "Never will I ramble
W: so far, far again.
W: W: 4. "O if I had but
W: my own heart to keep it,
W: "O if I had but
W: my own heart again,
W: "How closely in my bosom
W: I would lock it up for ever,
W: "And never would I ramble
W: so far, far again.
W:
W: 5. "All round my hat
W: I will wear the green willow,
W: "All round my hat
W: for twelve months and a day;
W: "If anyone should ask me
W: the reason why I wear it,
W: "I will tell them that my true love
W: is far, far away."
W:
W: 6. "O Phoebe, O Phoebe,
W: since for me you have lamented,
W: "You will find in the end
W: you'll have no cause to rue;
W: "For since I've found you faithful,
W: come make yourself contented,
W: "For all that I said was
W: to try if you was true."
W:
W: 7. Now William and Phoebe
W: in wedlock are united,
W: They live in a cottage
W: down by the riverside;
W: Let us hope that their comfort
W: and peace will ne'er be blighted,
W: Young lovers take example
W: by William and his bride.
L:1/8
Q:1/4=100
M:6/8
I:linebreak $
K:Gmix
"^Key signature of G in MS is here changed to C (G Mixolydian) to eliminate accidentals. The tune is unaltered. " D |
w: Come|
G3 (AG) F | G3 (AB) c | d2 d (ed) c | (d2 c) A2 A |$ G2 G (AG) F | G3 (AB) c | d2 d (ed) c |
w: all you * young|peo- ple * and|lis- ten to * my|dit- * ty, I'll|tell you how * young|Phoe- be * ac-|cused young Wil- * liam|
d3- d2 d |$ (de) c c2 e | (d2 c) A2 B | c2 A d2 G | (G2 F) D3 |$ G2 G (AG) F | G3 (AB) c |
w: wrong. * She|said * he had de-|ceived * her, it|sad- ly seemed to|grieve * her;|Left a- lone * one|eve- ning * she|
d2 d c2 B | G3- G2 |]
w: sang a mourn- ful|song. *|

Notes on GB/6b/1 The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/1 and GB/7a/70. In the MS the version sung by Mr. Verrall at Horsham in July 1909 (GB/7a/71) is appended to this version but crossed out.


GB/6b/2 All Round My Hat Version 2 of 2

File:GB-6b-2.mid

File:GB-6b-2.pdf

File:GB-6b-2.xml

abc notation

X:2
T:GB/6b/2 All Round My Hat Version 3 of 3
T:The following variant is from the collection of the late Mr. Hammond
C:Sung by Mrs. Crawford, West Milton (Dorset)
P:Noted by H.E.D. Hammond
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:1. Yesterday evening I was invited to a wedding
W: Unto a fair girl that provèd so unkind.
W: As soon as she began for to think on some other
W: The farmer, her own lovyer, still runs in her mind.
W:
W: 2. When supper was over and all things were ended
W: They all did conclude to give the bride a song.
W: The first that begun was the farmer, her own lovyer,
W: To give the bride a song, but it was not very long.
W:
W: 3. "O how can you sleep on another man's pillow
W: "Since you pretend that you love me so dear?
W: "Now for your sweet sake I'll wear a mournful willow
W: "Now and for ever I'll wear it for my dear."
W:
W: 4. (Omitted.)
W:
W: 5. The favour was granted and all things were ready
W: With sighing and crying they all went to bed.
W: 'Twas early one morning the young man arosèd
W: He went and he found that his new wife was dead.
W:
W: 6. (See above.)
W:
T:RVW (Ralph Vaughan Williams)
L:1/8
Q:1/4=100
M:6/8
I:linebreak $
K:D
"_(Last Verse)" D3 (ED) C | D3"^(a)" d2 c | B2 c d2 B | B3 A3 | B3 (Bc) d | F3 E2 D |$
w: All round * my|hat I will|wear the mourn- ful|will- ow|All round * my|hat for a|
E2 E (EF) G | F3- F2 A | (B2 A) B2 c | d2 c d2 B | A3 (G2 E) | F2 D A,2 A, |$ D2 D E2 E |
w: twelve- month and * a|day, * And|if * this here|will- ow it should|not be- *|come me Then I'll|leave it off for|
F3 d2 B | (A2 F)"^(b)" (G2 E) |"_(Last Verse)" D6 || D3 (ED) C | D3"^(a) var." A2 A | B2 c d2 B |$
w: ev- er and|e- * ver *|more.|All round * my|hat I will|wear the mourn- ful|
B3 A3 | B3 (Bc) d | F3 E2 D | E2 E (EF) G | F3- F2 A | (B2 A) B2 c |$ d2 c d2 B | A3 (G2 E) |
w: will- ow|All round * my|hat for a|twelve- month and * a|day, * And|if * this here|will- ow it should|not be- *|
F2 D A,2 A, | D2 D E2 E | F3 d2 B | (A2 F)"^(b) var." (GFE) | D6 |]
w: come me Then I'll|leave it off for|ev- er and|e- * ver * *|more.|


GB/6b/3 Highland Jane

File:GB-6b-3.mid

File:GB-6b-3.pdf

File:GB-6b-3.xml

abc notation

X:3
T:GB/6b/3 Highland Jane
T:I have noted the following variant of this song. R.V.W.
C:Sung by Mr. Burrage, "Rushetts," Rushetts Farm, near Capel, Surrey, August 1908
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams
L:1/8
M:3/4
I:linebreak $
K:Faeo
z A/B/ | cF F3 F | A/B/c B2 A>B | cf"^(a)" e2 c>B | AG F2 :|
$ c>d | ef e2 A>c | ef e3 f | fe cd/c/ BA | Bc FEFG |
$ AB"^(b)" c3 E | Ac B2 A>B | cf ec/B/ AG | F4 |
$|: A/B/ | cF F3 F | A/B/c B2 A>B |[M:2/4]"^(a) var." cf e/d/c/B/ |[M:3/4] AG F2 :|
$ z2 | c>d | ef e2 A>c | ef e3 f | fe cd/c/ BA | Bc FEFG |
$ AB"^(b) var." F3 E | Ac B2 A>B | cf ec/B/ AG | F4 |]


GB/6b/4 The Banks of Green Willow Version 1 of 4

File:GB-6b-4.mid

File:GB-6b-4.pdf

File:GB-6b-4.xml

abc notation

X:4 T:GB/6b/4 The Banks of Green Willow Version 2 of 4 T:Second Version C:Sung by Mr. Cornford, East Chiltington, July 1908 P:Noted by George Butterworth L:1/8 M:3/4 I:linebreak $ K:A A>B | c2 A2 B2 | A>G E>F =G>A | F>E D>F A2 | A2 E2 (3EF=G |$ A3 =G E>D | B,>C D2 D>D | E2 B3 E | FG A2 |]

Notes on GB/6b/4 In the Take 6 Catalogue this version is also entered as GB/6b/26. For versions 2-4 see GB/6b/27-9 below.


GB/6b/5 The Bonny Bunch of Roses

File:GB-6b-5.mid

File:GB-6b-5.pdf

File:GB-6b-5.xml

abc notation

X:5 T:GB/6b/5 The Bonny Bunch of Roses C:Sung by Mr. and Mrs. Cranstone, Billingshurst, June 1907 P:Noted by George Butterworth L:1/8 Q:1/4=80 M:4/4 I:linebreak $ K:Cdor "^DORIAN" G G | c3 d e2 d2 | (c3 B) G2 z G |$ c3 d e2 d2 | c2 (B=A) G2 G2 | c3 B G2 (FE) |$ w: By the|dan- gers of the|O- * cean, One|morn- ing in the|month of * June, The|feath- ered warb- ling *| (F2 G2) C2 (DE) | F2 (G=A) (BA) (GF) | G2 C2 C2 |] w: song * sters Their *|charm- ing * notes * so *|sweet did tune.|

Notes on GB/6b/5 The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/36 and GB/7b/4B.


GB/6b/6 On Christmas Night (Carol) Version 1 of 2

File:GB-6b-6.mid

File:GB-6b-6.pdf

File:GB-6b-6.xml

abc notation


X:6 T:GB/6b/6 On Christmas Night (Carol) T:First Version C:Sung by Mr George Knight, Horsham. April 1907 P:Noted by George Butterworth W: W:1. On Christmas night all Christians sing W: To hear what news the angels bring. W: News of great joy and news of mirth, W: News of our merciful Saviour's birth. W: W: W: 2. There's kings of kings, of earth and heaven, W: There's kings of angels and of men. W: Angels and men with joy may sing, W: To hear what news the angels bring. W: W: 3. For out of darkness we have light, W: Which makes all Christians sing this night. W: Pris'ners all in their chains rejoice, W: To hear the echo of a voice. L:1/4 Q:1/4=126 M:6/4 I:linebreak $ K:C E | G2 G F2 F | E2 E (D C) B, | C2 C (D E) F |$ E2 D C3 | E3 D2 C | (D E) F (G F) E | D6 | w: On|Christ- mas night all|Christ- ians sing, _ To|hear what news _ the|an- gels bring.|News of great|joy _ and news _ of|mirth,| G3 A3 |$ (G2 E) F3 | G3 C2 C | D E F E2 D | C3- C2 |] w: News of|News _ of,|News of our|mer- ci- ful Sav- iour's|birth _|

Notes on GB/6b/6 The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/125 and GB/7a/56.


GB/6b/7 On Christmas Night (Carol) Version 2 of 2

File:GB-6b-7.mid

File:GB-6b-7.pdf

File:GB-6b-7.xml

abc notation

X:7 T:GB/6b/7 On Christmas Night (Carol) T:Version 2 of 2 C:Sung by Mrs Cranstone, Billingshurst, June 1907 P:Noted by George Butterworth L:1/4 M:6/4 I:linebreak $ K:Cmix "^Mixolydian" C | D2 (C D) E F | G2 G D2 C | D2 C (D E) F | G2 G D3 |$ G2 B A3 | G3 (F E) D | G2 G C2 C | D E F E2 D | (C3 C2) |]

Notes on GB/6b/7 The tune is identical to that of GB/7a/57. See also GB/6a/126. For words to this carol see GB/6b/6 above. In the MS there is this note relevant to this Version 2: "The words belong to the first version. Mrs. Cranstone could only remember fragments. G.S.K.B(utterworth)."


GB/6b/8 The Cruel Father and Affectionate Lovers

File:GB-6b-8.mid

File:GB-6b-8.pdf

File:GB-6b-8.xml

abc notation

X:8 T:GB/6b/8 The Cruel Father and Affectionate Lovers C:Sung by Mr. George Knight, Horsham, April 1907 P:Noted by George Butterworth W: W:Under the title here given the song is often found on broadsides. W: It is included in the Journal, Vol. i No. 4, p.220, Vol. ii No. 7 W: pp. 97 and 98 and Vol. iii No. 13, p. 294, with many references W: of interest. A Surrey version with the tune harmonised is in W: English Traditional Songs and Carols under the title "The Young W: Servant Man" or "Two Affectionate Lovers". - L.E.B. W: L:1/4 Q:1/4=100 M:5/4 I:linebreak $ K:G D | G E D G G | A A A B (B/c/) |[M:3/2] d d c2 (B3/2 G/) |$[M:5/4] A A G2 D/ D/ | G E D G G/ G/ | w: It's|of a dam- sel both|fair and hand- some. These *|lines are true as *|I've been told. By the|banks of Shan- non in a| A A A B (B/c/) |$[M:3/2] d d c2 (B3/2 G/) |[M:5/4] A A G2 B | c d e c A |$[M:3/2] B c d B z d | w: lof- ty man- sion her *|fath- er claimed great *|store of gold. Her|hair was black as a|rav- en's fea- ther, Her| [M:5/4] c B A G E | F G D2 D |$ G E D G G | A A A B (B/c/) |[M:3/2] d d c2 B3/2 G/ | A A G3 |] w: form and fea- tures des-|cribe who can? But|since it's fol- ly be-|longs to nat- ure, She *|fell in love with a|ser- vant man.|

Notes on GB/6b/8 The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/56 and GB/7a/76.


GB/6b/9 Johnny Harte

File:GB-6b-9.mid

File:GB-6b-9.pdf

File:GB-6b-9.xml

abc notation

X:9 T:GB/6b/9 Johnny Harte C:Sung by Mr. Smith, at Stoke Lacy, Hereford, September 1907 P:Noted by George Butterworth W: W:Rest of words not noted - GSKB L:1/8 Q:1/4=100 M:6/8 I:linebreak $ K:Ddor "^Dorian" C | D2 D G2 G | (A2 B) c2 E | G2 E E2 D | C3- C2 C |$ D D D G2 G | (A2 B) c2 E | w: It's|of a High- land|sol- * dier lived|in the town of|Ross, _ He|court- ed a farm- er's|daugh- * ter, His| F D E D2 D | D3- D2 G |$ A2 G (AB) c | d3 c2 A | G2 E E2 D | C3- C2 C |$ D2 D G2 G | (A2 B) c2 E | w: name it was John- ny|Harte, _ For|six long months * they|court- ed, her|par- ents they know|not _ He|was their daugh- ter's|sweet * heart, dress'd| F D E D2 D | D3- D2 |] w: up in his ug- ly|plaid. _|

Notes on GB/6b/9 The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/29.


GB/6b/10 A Lawyer Fine and Gay Second Version

File:GB-6b-10.mid

File:GB-6b-10.pdf

File:GB-6b-10.xml

abc notation

X:10 T:GB/6b/10 A Lawyer Fine and Gay T:Second Version C:Sung by Mrs. Cranstone, Billingshurst, July 1907 P:Noted by George Butterworth W:(Editor's note: Words are given to this tune in the original MS but then crossed out, W: presumably by Butterworth himself. See GB/6b/10 for words to fit.) L:1/8 Q:1/4=100 M:6/8 I:linebreak $ K:C G | c2 c (cB) A | (GE) G C2 C | c2 d (ed) c |[M:9/8] (A2 B) c3 c2 d |$ e d c d3 c3 | A G A (E2 D) C2 G |[M:6/8] G E G (GE) G | (A2 B) c2 |]

Notes on GB/6b/10 The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/25. For the First Version see GB/6b/11 immediately below.


GB/6b/11 A Lawyer Fine and Gay First Version

File:GB-6b-11.mid

File:GB-6b-11.pdf

File:GB-6b-11.xml

abc notation

X:11 T:GB/6b/11 A Lawyer Fine and Gay T:First Version C:Sung by Mrs. Verrall, Horsham, 1908 P:Noted by Francis Jekyll W: W:1. It's of a lawyer fine and gay, W: Went riding through some city; W: It was there he espied a fair pretty maid; W: She was handsome and tall and pretty. W: W: 2. "May I go with you, my pretty maid?" W: He asked her so dearly; W: "You can do as you please, kind sir," she said, W: "But my father is there a-mowing." W: W: 3. This lawyer he got off his horse, W: Thinking that he might gain her, W: When she took such a fright right over the way, W: Thinking he might undo her. W: W: 4. This lawyer ran like any deer, W: Till he did overtake her, W: When all that he whispered in her ear W: Was what a fine lady he'd make her. W: W: 5. "I will take you up to fair London town, W: "And all such lovely places, W: "I will busk you into a silken gown, W: "Gold rings and gold chains and gold laces." W: W: 6. "I will have none of your silken gowns, W: "Nor go to none of your fine places. W: "I'll never be busked in a silken gown, W: "Gold rings nor gold chains nor gold laces." W: W: 7. "I never will be a lawyer's wife, W: "To live in a house of ruin; W: "I would rather be a poor man's wife. W: "My husband loves me dearly." W: W: 8. "I would rather be a poor man's wife. W: "My husband loves me dearly, W: "And between us both we manage to keep W: "A poor little innocent baby." W: W: Note the Aeolian cadence in this otherwise purely Ionian (or major) tune - R.V.W. W: W:Is this the original of "Mowing the barley" now so much sung? W: As "Oh where beese gwying" a version can be seen in Rev. G. Hill's W: "Wiltshire Folk Songs and Carols". W: - D. K. W:See also the note by Cecil Sharp prefacing GB/6B/11A - Ed. L:1/8 Q:1/4=120 M:6/8 I:linebreak $ K:C E | A2 B c2 A | G2 E C2 G | c2 d e2 c |$[M:9/8] (B2 c) d3 c2 d | e e c d3 (c2 B) |$ w: It's|of a law- yer|fine and gay, Went|rid- ing through some|ci- * ty, It was|there he es- pied a _| A B c (E2 D) C2 D |[M:6/8] E E E E2 D | (A2 G) A2 || w: fair pret- ty maid, _ She was|hand- some and tall and|pret- * ty.|

Notes on GB/6b/11 The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/25. For the Second Version see GB/6b/10 immediately above.


GB/6b/11A [A Lawyer Fine and Gay]

File:GB-6b-11A.mid

File:GB-6b-11A.pdf

File:GB-6b-11A.xml

abc notation

X:11A T:GB/6b/11A [A Lawyer Fine and Gay] C:Sung by Mrs. Elizabeth Handy at Ilmington, Warwickshire, April 1911 P:Noted by Cecil Sharp W: W:The following is the last stanza of a Warwickshire version. The rest of the words are not substantially W: different from the above* set. C. J. S. W:  W:* i.e. GB/6b/11 - Ed. L:1/8 Q:1/4=120 M:6/8 I:linebreak $ K:D A | d2 A B2 G | A2 C D2 A | d d e f2 d | (B2 c) d2 d |$ f2 f (ed) c | (Bc) d F2 D | w: I'd|ra- ther be a|poor man's wife and|sit at my wheel a-|spin- * ning Than|I would be _ a|law- * yer's wife, They| (DF) A (AG) F | (A2 d) d2 |] w: are _ the worst _ of|wo- * men.|


GB/6b/12 The Mistress Health

File:GB-6b-12.mid

File:GB-6b-12.pdf

File:GB-6b-12.xml

abc notation

X:12 T:GB/6b/12 The Mistress' Health GB/6b/13 [The Great Bell of Lincoln] C:Sung by Mr. George Knight, Horsham, April 1907 P:Noted by George Butterworth W: W:Butterworth also adds the following: To the tune of the above, Mr Knight sang also the following health song:- W: W: The Great Bell of Lincoln is broken in her frame, W: And she must be mended before she rings again, W: With new frame and new wheel, new clipper and new strings, W: O turn the bell over, hark, hark, how she rings. W: W: The last line refers to the reversing of the drinking horns W: after the health is drunk. GSKB W: W: The following note was appended by Anne Gilchrist to the above: W: This tune has a considerable resemblance to the old tune 'Jack W: Jintle' and also to 'The Jacket and the Petticoat' (Miss Mason's W: Nursery Rhymes) - a tune belonging to an eighteenth (?) century W: song called 'Nothing at All'. AGG L:1/4 Q:1/4=100 M:3/4 I:linebreak $ K:C C/ C/ F F | G E C | C A A | A2 c |$ G G G | G E C | C A A | A2 G |$ E G G | c G E | F G A | w: Now we've drunk our|mas- ter's health,|We'll drink our|dame's, And|we will be|mer- ry in|do- ing the|same: To|him we drank|one glass, To|her we'll drink| c2 A |$ G E C | F D D | E C C | C3 |] w: two, And|we will be|mer- ry be-|fore we do|go.|

Notes on GB/6b/12 The files for GB/6b/12 are identical to those for GB/6b/13. (Please refer to the MSS or to the PDF.)


GB/6b/13 [The Great Bell of Lincoln]

File:GB-6b-13.mid

File:GB-6b-13.pdf

File:GB-6b-13.xml

abc notation

X:12 T:GB/6b/12 The Mistress' Health GB/6b/13 [The Great Bell of Lincoln] C:Sung by Mr. George Knight, Horsham, April 1907 P:Noted by George Butterworth W: W:Butterworth also adds the following: To the tune of the above, Mr Knight sang also the following health song:- W: W: The Great Bell of Lincoln is broken in her frame, W: And she must be mended before she rings again, W: With new frame and new wheel, new clipper and new strings, W: O turn the bell over, hark, hark, how she rings. W: W: The last line refers to the reversing of the drinking horns W: after the health is drunk. GSKB W: W: The following note was appended by Anne Gilchrist to the above: W: This tune has a considerable resemblance to the old tune 'Jack W: Jintle' and also to 'The Jacket and the Petticoat' (Miss Mason's W: Nursery Rhymes) - a tune belonging to an eighteenth (?) century W: song called 'Nothing at All'. AGG L:1/4 Q:1/4=100 M:3/4 I:linebreak $ K:C C/ C/ F F | G E C | C A A | A2 c |$ G G G | G E C | C A A | A2 G |$ E G G | c G E | F G A | w: Now we've drunk our|mas- ter's health,|We'll drink our|dame's, And|we will be|mer- ry in|do- ing the|same: To|him we drank|one glass, To|her we'll drink| c2 A |$ G E C | F D D | E C C | C3 |] w: two, And|we will be|mer- ry be-|fore we do|go.|

Notes on GB/6b/13 The files for GB/6b/13 are identical to those for GB/6b/12. (Please refer to the MSS or to the PDF.)


GB/6b/14 Shule Agra

File:GB-6b-14.mid

File:GB-6b-14.pdf

File:GB-6b-14.xml

abc notation

X:14 T: GB/6b/14 Shule Agra C: Sung by Mr. Smith at Stoke Lacy, Hereford, September 1907 P: Noted by George Butterworth W: W: 1. O it's slan, slan, slan agussaroo, W:Time can only ease my woe, W: Since the lad of my heart from me did depart, W:Slan mavourneen, slan, slan. W: W:2. Then I'll sell my rock and I'll sell my wheel, W: To buy my love a sword of steel, W:That every battle he might win, W: Slan manourneen, slan, slan. W: W: 3. I wish I was on yonder hill, W:I'd sit me down and cry my fill; W: Every tear might turn a mill, W:Slan, mavourneen, slan, slan. W: W:4. Then round my petticoats I wear red, W: Oft times my parents wish that I was dead, W:As through the world I beg my bread, W: Slan, mavourneen, slan, slan. L:1/8 M:4/4 I:linebreak $ K:G "^Dorian" AB | c4 B4 | AGEF G4 |$ G3 E G2 B2 | (AG) A2 !fermata!E2 CD | E2 ED (CD) (EF) |$ w: O it's|slan, slan,|slan a- guss- a- roo,|Time can on- ly|ease * my woe, Since the|lad of my heart * from *| G2 AG E4 | c3 A B2 e2 | A4 A2 |] w: me did de- part,|Slan mav- our- neen,|slan, slan.|

Notes on GB/6b/14 Butterworth remarks that this piece is Dorian, whereas it is, in fact, Hyperdorian. The key signature should thus be G as it is here transcribed, and not C as it appears in the MS.


GB/6b/15 Admiral Benbow

File:GB-6b-15.mid

File:GB-6b-15.pdf

File:GB-6b-15.xml

abc notation

X:15 T:GB/6b/15 Admiral Benbow C:Sung by Mr. Crow, Filby, Norfolk, April 1910 P:Noted by Francis Jekyll and George Butterworth W:Words not noted. GSKB. L:1/4 Q:1/4=120 M:4/4 I:linebreak $ K:G "^Mixolydian influence" D/E/ =F/D/ | G B A A | G2 A/B/ c | d2 c B | A c B A | G B A G |$ F D G/F/ E | D2 B B/c/ | d B/A/ G G | G B d d | c B A A/F/ |$ D F A A | G3/2 A/ G F | E D B, C | D c B A | G2 |]


GB/6b/16 It's Of A Farmer All In This Town

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X:16 T:GB/6b/16 It's of a Farmer All in this Town C:Mr. Smith (p. 1), Stoke Lacy, Herefordshire, IX. 07 P:F.W. J(ekyll) & G.S.K. B(utterworth) T:[The Suffolk Miracle] W: W:1. It's of a farmer all in this town, W: His name was up through the country round; W: He had a daughter, a beauty bright, W: And she alone was his heart's delight. W: W: 2. Many a noble lord came this dame to see, W: But still she could fancy none of there; W: But of late came one of low degree, W: He came of late, so she fancied he. W: W: 3. When her father came of this to hear, W: He separated her from her dear; W: Three score miles he did her send, W: To her uncle's house, to her discontent. W: W: 4. One night as she was for her bed bound, W: She heard a noise and a dismal sound; W: Saying, "Mary dear, rise from your bed, W: ............................... W: W: 5. "Here is a token, my heart's delight, W: "Your father's steed to ride home this night; W: "Another token I've brought to you, W: "Your mother's cloak, and her silk coat too." W: W: 6. They rode more quickly than the wind, W: But still he minded his love behind; W: He heaved a sigh and thus did say, W: "Oh my dearest dear, how my head does ache." W: W: 7. At length they came to her father's gate, W: And these few words to his love he said, W: "Alight, my love, and go to your bed, W: "Your father's steed I'll see combed and fed." W: W: 8. A white holland handkerchief she drew, W: And bound it round his head, and tightly too; W: She went up to her father's hall, W: Loudly for her father she did call. W: W: 9. "Oh father dear, did you send for me, W: "By my loved Jimmy, kind sir?" said she; W: It's well he knew this young man was dead, W: Which made every hair stand up on his head. W: W: 10. This young man's darling cried more and more, W: Thus young man was dead just nine months or more W: The grave was opened where he was laid, W: With his love's holland handkerchief bound round his head. W: W: Butterworth adds: Mrs Whiting also sang this tune, W: practically without variation. The words printed W: consist of fragments given by the singers. They W: should be compared with 'The Suffolk Miracle' W: (Oxford Book of Ballads). GSKB Anne Gilchrist adds: See Child's Popular Ballads, under 'The Suffolk Miracle', for full notes on this ballad, "the representative in England of one of the most remarkable tales and one of the most impressive and beautiful ballads of the European continent". AGG Lucy Broadwood adds: To the editor: I hope a sub-title, 'The Suffolk Miracle' will be added for reference purposes. LEB (Take 6 Editorial note: No suitable replacement for the missing line has been found in Child, Bronson or the Oxford Book of Ballads. However, the text "And come with me," her true love said. will fit perfectly well for performance. SF) L:1/4 Q:1/4=120 M:3/2 I:linebreak $ K:Daeo "^Aeolian" (D/E/) | F G F2 A, A, | C D C3 G |$ G E C2 F3/2 G/ | A G A3 C | F E F2 F G |$ w: It's *|of a farm- er all|in this town, His|name was up through the|count- ry round; He|had a daugh- ter, a| A G (A d-) d d | (A/G/) A F2 D3/2 E/ | D D D3 |] w: beaut- y bright, _ _ And|she * a- lone was his|heart's de- light.|


GB/6b/17 The Tinker

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X:17 T:GB/6b/17 The Tinker C:Sung by Mr. James Landamore, Wroxham, Norfolk, April 1910 P:Noted by Francis Jekyll and George Butterworth W:Butterworth comments: Words not noted. GSKB This tune is very similar to ´Bridgwater Fair' W: (Folksongs from Somerset). An anonymous note in the file comments: To Mr Keel This seems W: to be an old country dance air. A lively tune of the same character is sung in Scotland to the W: "Tinkler's Waddin'", written by William Watt (1792 to 1859). There may have been a dance tune W: by that name (the Tinker) to which Watt's song was written. L:1/8 Q:1/4=120 M:6/8 I:linebreak $ K:Fmix C2 D | E2 E C2 D | EDE C3 | F=EF GAB | A2 G !fermata!F2 G | c2 B c2 A | BAG c2 B |$ c2 F F2 G | F2 E C2 D | EDE C2 D | EDE C3 | F=EF GAB | AGA F3 |]

Notes on GB/6b/17 This is a version of "The Tinker's Courtship." For a fuller version with copious notes on it see p.103 and p. 141 of Frank Purslow's "The Constant Lovers."


GB/6b/18 Little Brown Jug

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X:18 T:GB/6b/18 Little Brown Jug C:Sung by Mr. Smith, at Stoke Lacy, Hereford, September 1907 P:Noted by Francis Jekyll and George Butterworth W: W:1. Me and my wife we live alone W: In a neat little cottage we calls our own W: She likes gin and I likes rum W: And that's where we has lots of fun. W: Singing old brown ale, old brown beer, W: The bonny little brown jug that I loves dear. W: W: 2. If I had a cow that would give such milk W: I would dress her up in the finest silk W: I would feed her up on the best of hay W: I would milk her nine times every day. Singing...etc. W: W:3. Then it's if my brown jug was in gaol W: I'd pawn my shirt and bring it out on bail; W: And if my wife would me despise W: I'd up with my fists and give her two black eyes. Singing...etc. W: W: 4. Then in comes the landlord, so noble and fat W: He puts on his three-cocked hat W: He fills your beer till the cellar runs dry W: And he wouldn't care a damn if you live or die. Singing...etc. W: W: 5. The brewer brews it into a pan W: The landlord spills it into a can W: He fills your beer till the cellar runs dry W: And he wouldn't care a damn if you live or die. Singing...etc. W: W:Frank Kidson remarks: Is this a Folk-Song? JFK To which Lucy Broadwood responds: No! LEB W: Kidson then adds the following note: Little Brown Jug This is not a folk song. It is an American W: production which came to England about 1880. A copy will be found the 'The Scottish Student's W: Song Book' and other places. It is said to be by R. A. Eastburn. Frank Kidson L:1/4 Q:1/4=120 M:4/4 I:linebreak $ K:G "^Dorian" (B3/2 A/) | G E E (B,/C/) | D D D D/ D/ | E E/ E/ G/ G/ A |$ B A A2 | B B d B | w: Me *|and my wife we *|lives a- lone In a|neat lit- tle cot- tage we|calls our own,|She likes gin and| A A A (G/A/) |$ B B (B/A/) G | A A B B/ A/ | G E E2 |$ D D D3/2 D/ | G/ A/ B/ c/ d B/ A/ | w: I likes rum, And *|that's where we * has|lots of fun, Sing- ing|old brown ale,|old brown beer, The|bon- ny lit- tle brown jug that| G E E2 |] w: I loves dear.|


GB/6b/19 Horse Racing Song

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X:19 T:GB/6b/19 Horse Racing Song C:Sung by Mr. "Blue" Fisher, Tidenham, Norfolk, December 1911 P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth W: W:1. It's of three north noble country dukes from the Newmarket came W: All for a wager they did run, and the riders to do the same, W: The same, the same, and the riders to do the same. W: W: 2. And as they were a-riding along the road, they met with a little boy W: "Come show to me Lord Framplin's halls that his horses we may see." W: May see, may see, etc. W: W: 3. Then he took them into his middlemost stable, among those riders all W: There was great Greasy-heel, little Lamp-boy Jack, little Molly shall run with you all. W: W: 4. Then up bespoke the poorest duke, the poorest of those three W: "I'll run you for thirty thousand pounds, and tomorrow shall be the day." W: W: 5. So when Lord Framplin heard those words, he stood with his hat in his hand W: "I'll run you for gold whilst gold shall hold, and I'll make it upon your land." W: W: 6. Then the drums and the trumpets we did sound, all for them to get ready W: And all Lord Frampton had to say, "Mind you, Jack boy, and be steady." W: W: 7. The first milepost he did come at, Lord Thompson's man did say: W: "If you can't go no faster than this, kind sir, I'll show you the way." W: W: 8. The second milepost he did come at, the people all declared W: They hardly could decide the case between the horse and the mare. W: W: 9. There was heel to heel and toe to toe, so merrily they did run on, W: They were shoulder to shoulder and flank to flank, and the whip and touch began. W: W: 10. And just as they did climb the hill, Lord Framplin's mare being free W: She took to her heels and away did run, and Lord Framplin he carried the day. L:1/8 Q:1/4=120 M:4/4 I:linebreak $ K:Bb F2 | B2 B2 B2"^(a)" dc | c2 F2 !fermata!F2 F2 | B2 B2 (Bc) (de) |$ f6 (fe) | w: 1.~It's|of three north nob- le|coun- try dukes from|the New- mar- * ket *|came, All *| d2 (dc) B2"^(b)" (BA) | G2"^(c)" B2 F2 FF | GA B2 d2"^(d)" e2 |$[M:3/2] B4 G4 F2 F F | w: for a * wa- ger *|they did run, and the|rid- ers to do the|same, the same, and the| [M:4/4] GA"^(e)" B2 d2 (ec) | B6 ||$ F2 | B2 B2 B2"^(a) var." d2 | c2 F2 !fermata!F2 F2 | w: rid- ers to do the *|same.|||| B2 B2 (Bc) (de) |$ f6 (fe) | d2 (dc) B2"^(b) var." B2 | G2"^(c) var." (BG) F2 FF | w: |||| GA B2 d2"^(d) var." (ec) |$[M:3/2] B4 G4 F2 F F |[M:4/4] GA"^(e) var." (Bc) d2 (ec) | B6 |] w: ||||


GB/6b/20 Royal George

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X:20 T:GB/6b/20 Royal George C:Sung by Mr. Robert Hurr, Southwold, Suffolk, October 24th, 1910 P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth W: W:1. As we set sail from [for?] the rock of Gibraltar, W: As we set sail from sweet Dublin Bay, W: O little did we think of our sad mis fortune, W: A-sleeping in the briny sea, W: O little did we think of our sad misfortune, W: A-sleeping in the brin-y sea. W: W: 2. O there was one poor woman a-living in the city W: As soon as she heard that her husband was dead W: It filled her [?] poor heart full of grief and pity W: To hear what that poor woman said, W: It filled...etc. W: W: 3. She said, "I'll go and seek for my own true lover, W: "I'll go and sail the wide world round, W: "Then if my own true lover I do not discover, W: "All in some salt seas I will drown." W: Then if...etc. W: W:Take 6 Editorial note: See also GB/6b/23 The Wreck of the Royal George; the two songs are perhaps linked. L:1/8 Q:1/4=100 M:4/4 I:linebreak $ K:Bb (Bc) | d2 d2 d2 c3/2 d/ |"^(a)" (e>d) c3/2 B/ (B<A) G2- |[M:2/4] G3 d | w: As _|we set sail from~[for?] the|rock _ of Gib- ral- * tar,|_ As| [M:4/4] e3 (d/e/)"^(b)" f2 B F |$ A2 B2 !fermata!c3 F | B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F | w: we set _ sail from sweet|Dub- lin Bay, O|lit- tle did we think _ of our| (B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d |"^(c)" e2- (3e(fg) f3 e |$ d2 c2"^(d)" (B>A) (G>F) | w: sad _ mis- for- tune, A-|sleep- * ing _ in the|brin- y sea, _ O _| B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F | (B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d | e2- (3e(fg) f3 e | d2 c2 B2 ||$ (Bc) | w: lit- tle did we think _ of our|sad _ mis- for- tune, A-|sleep- * ing _ in the|brin- y sea.|| d2 d2 d2 c3/2 d/ |"^(a) var." (ed) c B (B<A) G2- |[M:2/4] G3 d | w: ||| [M:4/4] e3 (d/e/)"^(b) var." f3 B |$ B3/2 A/ B2 !fermata!c3 F | B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F | w: ||| (B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d |"^(c) var." e2 (fg) f3 e |$ d2 c2"^(d) var." (BA) (GF) | w: ||| B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F | (B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d | e2- (3e(fg) f3 e | d2 c2 B2 |] w: ||||


GB/6b/22 As Robin Was Driving

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X:22 T:GB/6b/22 As Robin Was Driving C:Sung by Mr. 'Blue' Fisher, Tidenham, Norfolk, December 1911 P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth W: W:Butterworth adds: The rest of the words are not suitable for publication. GSKB W: (Take 6 Editorial note: The words will, however, be found on p.8 of W: "The Ploughboy's Glory", edited by Michael Dawney and published by the EFDSS - SF) L:1/4 Q:1/4=120 M:3/4 I:linebreak $ K:Ador "^Dorian" ((A/B/)) | c B A |"^(a)" B E E |"^(b)" c B G | A2 (A/B/) | c A A |$ G E E/E/ | F D D | w: As *|Ro- bin was|driv- ing his|wag- on a-|long, The *|trees in full|blos- som and the|birds in full| E2 B | c B A | B E E |$ c B G | A2 (A/B/) | c A A | G E (E/"^?"F/) | G G A | E2 (D/C/) |$ w: song, I|saw a young|dam- sel was|going to and|fro, As *|Ro- bin was|driv- ing his *|wag- on gee-|ho, That's *| (C3/2 D/) (E/"^?"F/) | G !fermata!E2 | (c B) A | G E D | E A"^#?" G | A2 ||$ ((A/B/)) | c B A | w: well * done *|Ro- bin,|Drive * on,|Ro- bin, ride|up and gee-|ho.||| "^(a) var." G E E |"^(b) var." c B (A/"^?#"G/) | A2 (A/B/) | c A A |$ G E E/E/ | F D D | E2 B | w: ||||||| c B A | B E E |$ c B G | A2 (A/B/) | c A A | G E (E/"^?"F/) | G G A | E2 (D/C/) |$ w: |||||||| (C3/2 D/) (E/F/) | G !fermata!E2 | (c B) A | G E D | E A"^#?" G | A2 |] w: ||||||


GB/6b/23 The Wreck of the Royal George

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X:23 T:GB/6b/23 The Wreck of the Royal George C:Sung by W. Wickham, Blackham, Sussex, May, 1907. W: W:(I noted it in G.) W: W:Full English Editorial note: This song was not collected by Butterworth, but by Annie Gilchrist, who wrote a letter W: that was attached to GB/6b/20. Her letter was subsequently annoted by Lucy Broadwood. For reasons of space, W: the text is quoted here, rather than with GB/6b/20. Royal George To Mr Keel: I do not think this is properly a W: folk-song - at any rate as regards the tune. I obtained what appears to be the chorus from a young labourer in W: Sussex in 1907. He had learnt it "from other men" - very likely in camp, as he had been a volunteer and had learnt W: other songs in a similar way. I doubt whether the tune is even as old as the time of the loss of the Royal George W: (1782). The phrase "little did we think of our sad misfortune" certainly has quite a modern ring. I can't account W: for the "fourteen hundred men, women and children" - some other wreck seems to have got mixed up with the W: Royal George! A.G.G. I don't think we should print this. It does not seem to me to be anything other than a W: reminiscence of a quite late 18th Century composed story. LEB L:1/4 Q:1/4=110 M:4/4 I:linebreak $ K:Bb "^Chorus (in marching time)" !>!B !>!B !>!B !>!B | d (3c/ c/ B/ A3/4 G/4 F | f f g f/ d/ | w: Four- teen hun- dred|men, wo- men and chil- der- en,|On- ly four of them| B d c3/2 F/ |$ B3/4 c/4 d3/4 c/4 B F |[M:5/4] A B (c/>d/) !fermata!e f/ d/ | w: reached the shore (And)|all the Roy- al George and|all its glo- * ries They went| [M:4/4] e (3(d/ c/) B/ c f | B2 z2 |] w: down and * was seen no|more.|

Notes on GB/6b/23 This was collected not by Butterworth but by Annie Gilchrist. See GB-6b-23.pdf for more information.


GB/6b/24 [O Madam I'll Present You] [The Keys of Heaven] Version 1 of 2

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X:24 T:GB/6b/24 [O Madam I'll Present You] T:[The Keys of Heaven] 1st Version C:Sung by Mr. Woods, Tidenham, Norfolk, December 1911 P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth W: W:1. O Madam I'll present you a fine coach and six, W: Four black horses as black as any jet, W: If you will walk abroad with me, W: If you will walk abroad with me. W: W: 2. O I won't accept your fine coach and six, (etc.) W: W: 3. O Madam I'll present you a fine easy chair, W: To set in the garden and take the morning air, If you... (etc.) W: W: 4. O I won't accept... (etc.) W: W: 5. O Madam I'll present you a fine silken gown, W: Four yards long all a-trailed on the ground, W: If you... (etc.) W: W: 6. O I won't accept... (etc.) W: W:7. O Madam I'll present you a fine gold watch, W: To hang by your side to tell you what's the time, W: If you... (etc.) W: W: 8. O I won't accept... (etc.) W: W: 9. O Madam I'll present you the key of my chest, W: And all my gold jewels and jewels I possess, W: If you... (etc.) W: W: 10. O I won't accept... (etc.) W: W: 11. O Madam I'll present you the key of my heart, W: And married we will be and never never part, W: If you... (etc.) W: W: 12. O I will accept... (etc.) W: W:Lucy Broadwood has annotated this ms, first by crossing out Butterworth's title of "The Keys of Heaven" W: and writing in "No! it isn't - LEB" and she adds a the following note: Please don't call this 'The Keys of W: Heaven' which don't come into this version & is merely the title of my particular version in 'County Songs' W: which does turn on the Keys of Heaven. "Madam I present you" is the title that usually covers this class of song. LEB If any songs are to be omitted I should leave this out as the song is in most nursery-rhyme books in similar versions (Halliwell, Chambers, etc.etc.etc.) L:1/8 Q:1/4=120 M:4/4 I:linebreak $ K:G D2 | G G G G G2 B A | G2 D D D4 |$ A2 A2 A2 G A | B d c A B3 G | B3 G A3 F |$ G2 B2 D2 z B | w: O|Ma dam, I'll pre- sent you a|fine coach and six,|Four black hor- ses as|black as an- y jet, If|you will walk a-|broad with me, If| c B A G D2 F2 | G6 |] w: you will walk a- broad with|me.|


GB/6b/25 [O Madam I'll Present You] [The Keys of Heaven] Version 2 of 2

File:GB-6b-25.mid

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File:GB-6b-25-Specimen setting.pdf

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X:25 T:GB/6b/25 [O Madam I'll Present You] T: [The Keys of Heaven] 2nd Version C:Sung at Fernhurst, Sussex P:Noted by Francis Jekyll L:1/8 Q:1/4=110 M:4/4 I:linebreak $ K:G G | DG GG G2 GG | A>B cA B2 BA | GGGF E2 FG | A3/2 B/ A G GF Bd |$[M:3/4] d4 d2 | B4 AG | [M:4/4] G2 B2 D2 z D | EFGA B2 A2 | G6 |]


GB/6b/26 The Banks of Green Willow Version 1 of 4 (Duplicate)

Notes on GB/6b/26 See GB/6b/4 and the Notes to it.


GB/6b/27 The Banks of Green Willow Version 2 of 4

File:GB-6b-27.mid

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X:27 T:GB/6b/27 The Banks of Green Willow Version 2 of 4 T:Second Version C:Sung by Mr. Cornford, East Chiltington, July 1908 P:Noted by George Butterworth L:1/8 M:3/4 I:linebreak $ K:A A>B | c2 A2 B2 | A>G E>F =G>A | F>E D>F A2 | A2 E2 (3EF=G |$ A3 =G E>D | B,>C D2 D>D | E2 B3 E | FG A2 |]


GB/6b/28 The Banks of Green Willow Version 3 of 4

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X:28 T:GB/6b/28 The Banks of Green Willow Version 3 of 4 T:The following tune comes from the collection of the late Mr. Hammond. R.V.W. C:Sung by Mr. J. Welsh, Wareham (Dorset) P:Noted by H.E.D. Hammond L:1/4 M:3/4 I:linebreak $ K:G G | B G B | A F D | E3/2 F/ G/ E/ |"^(a)" D B, B, |$ G G B,/ B,/ | C E B,/ C/ | D c B | A G ||$ G | w: 'Tis|of a sea|cap- tain who|lived near the sea-|side (o) he|court a fam- ous|daught- er that he|once love so|dear- ly.|Come| B/ >A/ G B | A/ >F/ D G/ F/ | E C A/ F/ | (G/>F/) D D |$ G G B, |"^(b)" C E B,/C/ | D c B | A G ||$ w: toll the bell come|toll the bell oh come|toll it loud and|eas- * i- ly||||| G | B G B | A F D | E3/2 F/ G/E/ |"^(a) var." D/C/ B, D |$ G G B, | C B, B,/C/ | D c B | A G ||$ w: ||||||||| G | B/>A/ G B | A/>F/ D G/F/ | E C A/F/ | G/>F/ D D |$ G G B, |"^(b) var." C B, B,/C/ | D c B | w: |||||||| A G |] w: |


GB/6b/29 The Banks of Green Willow Version 4 of 4

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X:29 T:GB/6b/29 The Banks of Green Willow Version 4 of 4 T:The Merchant's Daughter [Bonnie Annie] C:As sung in Aberdeenshire in his childhood P:Noted by the Rev. J.K. Maconachie L:1/8 M:4/4 I:linebreak $ K:D D | F2 D >D D2 E F |$ d2 e d B A2 A | d2 c >B A2 D >E |$ F2 A >F E D2 :| w: There|was a rich mer- chant who|lived in Dum- bar- ton, And|he had a daugh- ter whose|name was called An- nie.| w: Whose|name was called An- ie, whose|name was called An- nie, And|he had a daugh- ter whose|name was called An- nie.|