Difference between revisions of "Take 6 Transcription Programme: The Butterworth Archive, MS 6b"

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Link to [[Take 6 Transcription Programme]] Home Page
 
Link to [[Take 6 Transcription Programme]] Home Page
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 +
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'''For playback, abc files, and midi files, of these transcriptions that are linked to their original MSS enter the filenames [LEB/2/1/1 or whatever] in the search box here. [[http://www.vwml.org/]]'''
  
  
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'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:1<br>
 +
T:GB/6a/1 All Round My Hat Version 1 of 3<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. Edmund Knight, Washington, December 1907<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:1. Come all you young people,<br>
 +
W: and listen to my ditty,<br>
 +
W: I'll tell you how young Phoebe<br>
 +
W: accused young William wrong;<br>
 +
W:  She said he had deceived her,<br>
 +
W:  it sadly seemed to grieve her.<br>
 +
W:  Left alone one evening<br>
 +
W:  she sang a mournful song.<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
W:  2. "Young men are false,<br>
 +
W:  they are so deceitful,<br>
 +
W:  "Young men are false,<br>
 +
W:  they seldom do prove true;<br>
 +
W:  "Rambling and ranging,<br>
 +
W:  their minds are always changing,<br>
 +
W:  "They are always seeking<br>
 +
W:  for some young girl that's new.<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
W:  3. "Many a long hour<br>
 +
W:  have I spent in courting,<br>
 +
W:  "Many a long hour<br>
 +
W:  have I spent in vain;<br>
 +
W:  "But since it is my fortune<br>
 +
W:  that I must die a maiden,<br>
 +
W:  "Never will I ramble<br>
 +
W:  so far, far again.<br>
 +
W:
 +
W:  4. "O if I had but<br>
 +
W:  my own heart to keep it,<br>
 +
W:  "O if I had but<br>
 +
W:  my own heart again,<br>
 +
W:  "How closely in my bosom<br>
 +
W:  I would lock it up for ever,<br>
 +
W:  "And never would I ramble<br>
 +
W:  so far, far again.<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
W:  5. "All round my hat<br>
 +
W:  I will wear the green willow,<br>
 +
W:  "All round my hat<br>
 +
W:  for twelve months and a day;<br>
 +
W:  "If anyone should ask me<br>
 +
W:  the reason why I wear it,<br>
 +
W:  "I will tell them that my true love<br>
 +
W:  is far, far away."<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
W:  6. "O Phoebe, O Phoebe,<br>
 +
W:  since for me you have lamented,<br>
 +
W:  "You will find in the end<br>
 +
W: you'll have no cause to rue;<br>
 +
W:  "For since I've found you faithful,<br>
 +
W:  come make yourself contented,<br>
 +
W:  "For all that I said was<br>
 +
W:  to try if you was true."<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
W:  7. Now William and Phoebe<br>
 +
W:  in wedlock are united,<br>
 +
W:  They live in a cottage<br>
 +
W:  down by the riverside;<br>
 +
W:  Let us hope that their comfort<br>
 +
W:  and peace will ne'er be blighted,<br>
 +
W:  Young lovers take example<br>
 +
W:  by William and his bride.<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=100<br>
 +
M:6/8<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:Gmix<br>
 +
"^Key signature of G in MS is here changed to C (G Mixolydian) to eliminate accidentals. The tune is unaltered. " D | <br>
 +
w: Come|<br>
 +
G3 (AG) F | G3 (AB) c | d2 d (ed) c | (d2 c) A2 A |$ G2 G (AG) F | G3 (AB) c | d2 d (ed) c | <br>
 +
w: all you * young|peo- ple * and|lis- ten to * my|dit- * ty, I'll|tell you how * young|Phoe- be * ac-|cused young Wil- * liam|<br>
 +
d3- d2 d |$ (de) c c2 e | (d2 c) A2 B | c2 A d2 G | (G2 F) D3 |$ G2 G (AG) F | G3 (AB) c |<br>
 +
w: wrong. * She|said * he had de-|ceived * her, it|sad- ly seemed to|grieve * her;|Left a- lone * one|eve- ning * she|<br>
 +
d2 d c2 B | G3- G2 |]<br>
 +
w: sang a mourn- ful|song. *|<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/1'' The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/1 and GB/7a/70. In the MS the version sung by Mr. Verrall at Horsham in July 1909 (GB/7a/71) is appended to this version but crossed out.  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/1'' The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/1 and GB/7a/70. In the MS the version sung by Mr. Verrall at Horsham in July 1909 (GB/7a/71) is appended to this version but crossed out.  
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'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:2<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/2 All Round My Hat Version 3 of 3<br>
 +
T:The following variant is from the collection of the late Mr. Hammond<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mrs. Crawford, West Milton (Dorset)<br>
 +
P:Noted by H.E.D. Hammond<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:1. Yesterday evening I was invited to a wedding<br>
 +
W: Unto a fair girl that provèd so unkind.<br>
 +
W: As soon as she began for to think on some other<br>
 +
W:  The farmer, her own lovyer, still runs in her mind.<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
W:  2. When supper was over and all things were ended<br>
 +
W:  They all did conclude to give the bride a song.<br>
 +
W:  The first that begun was the farmer, her own lovyer,<br>
 +
W:  To give the bride a song, but it was not very long.<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
W:  3. "O how can you sleep on another man's pillow<br>
 +
W:  "Since you pretend that you love me so dear?<br>
 +
W:  "Now for your sweet sake I'll wear a mournful willow<br>
 +
W:  "Now and for ever I'll wear it for my dear."<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
W:  4. (Omitted.)<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
W:  5. The favour was granted and all things were ready<br>
 +
W:  With sighing and crying they all went to bed.<br>
 +
W:  'Twas early one morning the young man arosèd<br>
 +
W:  He went and he found that his new wife was dead.<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
W:  6. (See above.)<br>
 +
W: <br>
 +
T:RVW (Ralph Vaughan Williams)<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=100<br>
 +
M:6/8<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:D<br>
 +
"_(Last Verse)" D3 (ED) C | D3"^(a)" d2 c | B2 c d2 B | B3 A3 | B3 (Bc) d | F3 E2 D |$<br>
 +
w: All round * my|hat I will|wear the mourn- ful|will- ow|All round * my|hat for a|<br>
 +
E2 E (EF) G | F3- F2 A | (B2 A) B2 c | d2 c d2 B | A3 (G2 E) | F2 D A,2 A, |$ D2 D E2 E |<br>
 +
w: twelve- month and * a|day, * And|if * this here|will- ow it should|not be- *|come me Then I'll|leave it off for|<br>
 +
F3 d2 B | (A2 F)"^(b)" (G2 E) |"_(Last Verse)" D6 || D3 (ED) C | D3"^(a) var." A2 A | B2 c d2 B |$<br>
 +
w: ev- er and|e- * ver *|more.|All round * my|hat I will|wear the mourn- ful|<br>
 +
B3 A3 | B3 (Bc) d | F3 E2 D | E2 E (EF) G | F3- F2 A | (B2 A) B2 c |$ d2 c d2 B | A3 (G2 E) |<br>
 +
w: will- ow|All round * my|hat for a|twelve- month and * a|day, * And|if * this here|will- ow it should|not be- *|<br>
 +
F2 D A,2 A, | D2 D E2 E | F3 d2 B | (A2 F)"^(b) var." (GFE) | D6 |] <br>
 +
w: come me Then I'll|leave it off for|ev- er and|e- * ver * *|more.|<br>
  
  
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'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:3<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/3 Highland Jane<br>
 +
T:I have noted the following variant of this song. R.V.W.<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. Burrage, "Rushetts," Rushetts Farm, near Capel, Surrey, August 1908<br>
 +
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
M:3/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:Faeo<br>
 +
z A/B/ | cF F3 F | A/B/c B2 A>B | cf"^(a)" e2 c>B | AG F2 :|<br>
 +
$ c>d | ef e2 A>c | ef e3 f | fe cd/c/ BA | Bc FEFG |<br>
 +
$ AB"^(b)" c3 E | Ac B2 A>B | cf ec/B/ AG | F4 |<br>
 +
$|: A/B/ | cF F3 F | A/B/c B2 A>B |[M:2/4]"^(a) var." cf e/d/c/B/ |[M:3/4] AG F2 :|<br>
 +
$ z2 | c>d | ef e2 A>c | ef e3 f | fe cd/c/ BA | Bc FEFG |<br>
 +
$ AB"^(b) var." F3 E | Ac B2 A>B | cf ec/B/ AG | F4 |]<br>
  
  
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'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:4<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/4 The Banks of Green Willow Version 2 of 4<br>
 +
T:Second Version<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. Cornford, East Chiltington, July 1908<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
M:3/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:A<br>
 +
A>B | c2 A2 B2 | A>G E>F =G>A | F>E D>F A2 | A2 E2 (3EF=G |$ A3 =G E>D | B,>C D2 D>D | E2 B3 E |<br>
 +
FG A2 |]<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/4'' In the Take 6 Catalogue this version is also entered as GB/6b/26. For versions 2-4 see GB/6b/27-9 below.
 
''Notes on GB/6b/4'' In the Take 6 Catalogue this version is also entered as GB/6b/26. For versions 2-4 see GB/6b/27-9 below.
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'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:5<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/5 The Bonny Bunch of Roses<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. and Mrs. Cranstone, Billingshurst, June 1907<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=80<br>
 +
M:4/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:Cdor<br>
 +
"^DORIAN" G G | c3 d e2 d2 | (c3 B) G2 z G |$ c3 d e2 d2 | c2 (B=A) G2 G2 | c3 B G2 (FE) |$<br>
 +
w: By the|dan- gers of the|O- * cean, One|morn- ing in the|month of * June, The|feath- ered warb- ling *|<br>
 +
(F2 G2) C2 (DE) | F2 (G=A) (BA) (GF) | G2 C2 C2 |]<br>
 +
w: song * sters Their *|charm- ing * notes * so *|sweet did tune.|<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/5'' The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/36 and GB/7b/4B.
 
''Notes on GB/6b/5'' The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/36 and GB/7b/4B.
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'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:6<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/6 On Christmas Night (Carol)<br>
 +
T:First Version<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr George Knight, Horsham. April 1907<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:1. On Christmas night all Christians sing<br>
 +
W: To hear what news the angels bring.<br>
 +
W: News of great joy and news of mirth,<br>
 +
W: News of our merciful Saviour's birth.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  2. There's kings of kings, of earth and heaven,<br>
 +
W:  There's kings of angels and of men.<br>
 +
W:  Angels and men with joy may sing,<br>
 +
W:  To hear what news the angels bring.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  3. For out of darkness we have light,<br>
 +
W:  Which makes all Christians sing this night.<br>
 +
W:  Pris'ners all in their chains rejoice,<br>
 +
W:  To hear the echo of a voice.<br>
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
Q:1/4=126<br>
 +
M:6/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:C<br>
 +
E | G2 G F2 F | E2 E (D C) B, | C2 C (D E) F |$ E2 D C3 | E3 D2 C | (D E) F (G F) E | D6 |<br>
 +
w: On|Christ- mas night all|Christ- ians sing, _ To|hear what news _ the|an- gels bring.|News of great|joy _ and news _ of|mirth,|<br>
 +
G3 A3 |$ (G2 E) F3 | G3 C2 C | D E F E2 D | C3- C2 |]<br>
 +
w: News of|News _ of,|News of our|mer- ci- ful Sav- iour's|birth _|<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/6'' The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/125 and GB/7a/56.
 
''Notes on GB/6b/6'' The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/125 and GB/7a/56.
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'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:7<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/7 On Christmas Night (Carol)<br>
 +
T:Version 2 of 2<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mrs Cranstone, Billingshurst, June 1907<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
M:6/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:Cmix<br>
 +
"^Mixolydian" C | D2 (C D) E F | G2 G D2 C | D2 C (D E) F | G2 G D3 |$ G2 B A3 | G3 (F E) D |<br>
 +
G2 G C2 C | D E F E2 D | (C3 C2) |]<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/7''  The tune is identical to that of GB/7a/57. See also GB/6a/126. For words to this carol see GB/6b/6 above. In the MS there is this note relevant to this Version 2: "The words belong to the first version. Mrs. Cranstone could only remember fragments. G.S.K.B(utterworth)."  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/7''  The tune is identical to that of GB/7a/57. See also GB/6a/126. For words to this carol see GB/6b/6 above. In the MS there is this note relevant to this Version 2: "The words belong to the first version. Mrs. Cranstone could only remember fragments. G.S.K.B(utterworth)."  
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'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:8<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/8 The Cruel Father and Affectionate Lovers<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. George Knight, Horsham, April 1907<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:Under the title here given the song is often found on broadsides.<br>
 +
W: It is included in the Journal, Vol. i No. 4, p.220, Vol. ii No. 7<br>
 +
W: pp. 97 and 98 and Vol. iii No. 13, p. 294, with many references<br>
 +
W:  of interest. A Surrey version with the tune harmonised is in<br>
 +
W:  English Traditional Songs and Carols under the title "The Young<br>
 +
W:  Servant Man" or "Two Affectionate Lovers". - L.E.B.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
Q:1/4=100<br>
 +
M:5/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:G<br>
 +
D | G E D G G | A A A B (B/c/) |[M:3/2] d d c2 (B3/2 G/) |$[M:5/4] A A G2 D/ D/ | G E D G G/ G/ | <br>
 +
w: It's|of a dam- sel both|fair and hand- some. These *|lines are true as *|I've been told. By the|banks of Shan- non in a|<br>
 +
A A A B (B/c/) |$[M:3/2] d d c2 (B3/2 G/) |[M:5/4] A A G2 B | c d e c A |$[M:3/2] B c d B z d |<br>
 +
w: lof- ty man- sion her *|fath- er claimed great *|store of gold. Her|hair was black as a|rav- en's fea- ther, Her|<br>
 +
[M:5/4] c B A G E | F G D2 D |$ G E D G G | A A A B (B/c/) |[M:3/2] d d c2 B3/2 G/ | A A G3 |]<br>
 +
w: form and fea- tures des-|cribe who can? But|since it's fol- ly be-|longs to nat- ure, She *|fell in love with a|ser- vant man.|<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/8'' The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/56 and GB/7a/76.
 
''Notes on GB/6b/8'' The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/56 and GB/7a/76.
Line 111: Line 359:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:9<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/9 Johnny Harte<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. Smith, at Stoke Lacy, Hereford, September 1907<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:Rest of words not noted - GSKB<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=100<br>
 +
M:6/8<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:Ddor<br>
 +
"^Dorian" C | D2 D G2 G | (A2 B) c2 E | G2 E E2 D | C3- C2 C |$ D D D G2 G | (A2 B) c2 E |<br>
 +
w: It's|of a High- land|sol- * dier lived|in the town of|Ross, _ He|court- ed a farm- er's|daugh- * ter, His|<br>
 +
F D E D2 D | D3- D2 G |$ A2 G (AB) c | d3 c2 A | G2 E E2 D | C3- C2 C |$ D2 D G2 G | (A2 B) c2 E |<br>
 +
w: name it was John- ny|Harte, _ For|six long months * they|court- ed, her|par- ents they know|not _ He|was their daugh- ter's|sweet * heart, dress'd|<br>
 +
F D E D2 D | D3- D2 |]<br>
 +
w: up in his ug- ly|plaid. _|<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/9'' The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/29.
 
''Notes on GB/6b/9'' The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/29.
 
  
  
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'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:10<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/10 A Lawyer Fine and Gay<br>
 +
T:Second Version<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mrs. Cranstone, Billingshurst, July 1907<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:(Editor's note: Words are given to this tune in the original MS but then crossed out,<br>
 +
W: presumably by Butterworth himself. See GB/6b/10 for words to fit.)<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=100<br>
 +
M:6/8<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:C<br>
 +
G | c2 c (cB) A | (GE) G C2 C | c2 d (ed) c |[M:9/8] (A2 B) c3 c2 d |$ e d c d3 c3 |<br>
 +
A G A (E2 D) C2 G |[M:6/8] G E G (GE) G | (A2 B) c2 |]<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/10'' The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/25. For the First Version see GB/6b/11 immediately below.
 
''Notes on GB/6b/10'' The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/25. For the First Version see GB/6b/11 immediately below.
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'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:11<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/11 A Lawyer Fine and Gay<br>
 +
T:First Version<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mrs. Verrall, Horsham, 1908<br>
 +
P:Noted by Francis Jekyll<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:1. It's of a lawyer fine and gay,<br>
 +
W: Went riding through some city;<br>
 +
W: It was there he espied a fair pretty maid;<br>
 +
W: She was handsome and tall and pretty.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: 2. "May I go with you, my pretty maid?"<br>
 +
W:  He asked her so dearly;<br>
 +
W:  "You can do as you please, kind sir," she said,<br>
 +
W:  "But my father is there a-mowing."<br>
 +
W:<br> 
 +
W:  3. This lawyer he got off his horse,<br>
 +
W:  Thinking that he might gain her,<br>
 +
W:  When she took such a fright right over the way,<br>
 +
W:  Thinking he might undo her.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  4. This lawyer ran like any deer,<br>
 +
W:  Till he did overtake her,<br>
 +
W:  When all that he whispered in her ear<br>
 +
W:  Was what a fine lady he'd make her.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  5. "I will take you up to fair London town,<br>
 +
W:  "And all such lovely places,<br>
 +
W:  "I will busk you into a silken gown,<br>
 +
W:  "Gold rings and gold chains and gold laces."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  6. "I will have none of your silken gowns,<br>
 +
W:  "Nor go to none of your fine places.<br>
 +
W:  "I'll never be busked in a silken gown,<br>
 +
W:  "Gold rings nor gold chains nor gold laces."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  7. "I never will be a lawyer's wife,<br>
 +
W:  "To live in a house of ruin;<br>
 +
W:  "I would rather be a poor man's wife.<br>
 +
W:  "My husband loves me dearly."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  8. "I would rather be a poor man's wife.<br>
 +
W:  "My husband loves me dearly,<br>
 +
W:  "And between us both we manage to keep<br>
 +
W:  "A poor little innocent baby."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: Note the Aeolian cadence in this otherwise purely Ionian (or major) tune - R.V.W.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:Is this the original of "Mowing the barley" now so much sung?<br>
 +
W:  As "Oh where beese gwying" a version can be seen in Rev. G. Hill's<br>
 +
W: "Wiltshire Folk Songs and Carols".<br>
 +
W:                                      - D. K.<br>
 +
W:See also the note by Cecil Sharp prefacing GB/6B/11A  - Ed.<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=120<br>
 +
M:6/8<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:C<br>
 +
E | A2 B c2 A | G2 E C2 G | c2 d e2 c |$[M:9/8] (B2 c) d3 c2 d | e e c d3 (c2 B) |$<br>
 +
w: It's|of a law- yer|fine and gay, Went|rid- ing through some|ci- * ty, It was|there he es- pied a _|<br>
 +
A B c (E2 D) C2 D |[M:6/8] E E E E2 D | (A2 G) A2 ||<br>
 +
w: fair pret- ty maid, _ She was|hand- some and tall and|pret- * ty.|<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/11'' The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/25. For the Second Version see GB/6b/10 immediately above.
 
''Notes on GB/6b/11'' The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/25. For the Second Version see GB/6b/10 immediately above.
Line 151: Line 497:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:11A<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/11A [A Lawyer Fine and Gay]<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mrs. Elizabeth Handy at Ilmington, Warwickshire, April 1911<br>
 +
P:Noted by Cecil Sharp<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:The following is the last stanza of a Warwickshire version. The rest of the words are not substantially<br>
 +
W: different from the above* set. C. J. S.<br>
 +
W:<br> 
 +
W:* i.e. GB/6b/11 - Ed.<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=120<br>
 +
M:6/8<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:D<br>
 +
A | d2 A B2 G | A2 C D2 A | d d e f2 d | (B2 c) d2 d |$ f2 f (ed) c | (Bc) d F2 D |
 +
w: I'd|ra- ther be a|poor man's wife and|sit at my wheel a-|spin- * ning Than|I would be _ a|law- * yer's wife, They|<br>
 +
(DF) A (AG) F | (A2 d) d2 |]<br>
 +
w: are _ the worst _ of|wo- * men.|<br>
  
  
Line 162: Line 528:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:12<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/12 The Mistress' Health GB/6b/13 [The Great Bell of Lincoln]<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. George Knight, Horsham, April 1907<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:Butterworth also adds the following: To the tune of the above, Mr Knight sang also the following health song:-<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: The Great Bell of Lincoln is broken in her frame,<br>
 +
W: And she must be mended before she rings again,<br>
 +
W:  With new frame and new wheel, new clipper and new strings,<br>
 +
W:  O turn the bell over, hark, hark, how she rings.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  The last line refers to the reversing of the drinking horns<br>
 +
W:  after the health is drunk. GSKB<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  The following note was appended by Anne Gilchrist to the above:<br>
 +
W:  This tune has a considerable resemblance to the old tune 'Jack<br>
 +
W:  Jintle' and also to 'The Jacket and the Petticoat' (Miss Mason's<br>
 +
W:  Nursery Rhymes) - a tune belonging to an eighteenth (?) century<br>
 +
W:  song called 'Nothing at All'. AGG<br>
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
Q:1/4=100<br>
 +
M:3/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:C<br>
 +
C/ C/ F F | G E C | C A A | A2 c |$ G G G | G E C | C A A | A2 G |$ E G G | c G E | F G A |<br>
 +
w: Now we've drunk our|mas- ter's health,|We'll drink our|dame's, And|we will be|mer- ry in|do- ing the|same: To|him we drank|one glass, To|her we'll drink|<br>
 +
c2 A |$ G E C | F D D | E C C | C3 |]<br>
 +
w: two, And|we will be|mer- ry be-|fore we do|go.|<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/12'' The files for GB/6b/12 are identical to those for GB/6b/13. (Please refer to the MSS or to the PDF.)
 
''Notes on GB/6b/12'' The files for GB/6b/12 are identical to those for GB/6b/13. (Please refer to the MSS or to the PDF.)
Line 175: Line 572:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:13<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/12 The Mistress' Health GB/6b/13 [The Great Bell of Lincoln]<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. George Knight, Horsham, April 1907<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:Butterworth also adds the following: To the tune of the above, Mr Knight sang also the following health song:-<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: The Great Bell of Lincoln is broken in her frame,<br>
 +
W: And she must be mended before she rings again,<br>
 +
W:  With new frame and new wheel, new clipper and new strings,<br>
 +
W:  O turn the bell over, hark, hark, how she rings.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  The last line refers to the reversing of the drinking horns<br>
 +
W:  after the health is drunk. GSKB<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  The following note was appended by Anne Gilchrist to the above:<br>
 +
W:  This tune has a considerable resemblance to the old tune 'Jack<br>
 +
W:  Jintle' and also to 'The Jacket and the Petticoat' (Miss Mason's<br>
 +
W:  Nursery Rhymes) - a tune belonging to an eighteenth (?) century<br>
 +
W:  song called 'Nothing at All'. AGG<br>
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
Q:1/4=100<br>
 +
M:3/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:C<br>
 +
C/ C/ F F | G E C | C A A | A2 c |$ G G G | G E C | C A A | A2 G |$ E G G | c G E | F G A |
 +
w: Now we've drunk our|mas- ter's health,|We'll drink our|dame's, And|we will be|mer- ry in|do- ing the|same: To|him we drank|one glass, To|her we'll drink|<br>
 +
c2 A |$ G E C | F D D | E C C | C3 |]<br>
 +
w: two, And|we will be|mer- ry be-|fore we do|go.|<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/13'' The files for GB/6b/13 are identical to those for GB/6b/12. (Please refer to the MSS or to the PDF.)
 
''Notes on GB/6b/13'' The files for GB/6b/13 are identical to those for GB/6b/12. (Please refer to the MSS or to the PDF.)
Line 188: Line 616:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:14<br>
 +
T: GB/6b/14 Shule Agra<br>
 +
C: Sung by Mr. Smith at Stoke Lacy, Hereford, September 1907<br>
 +
P: Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: 1. O it's slan, slan, slan agussaroo<br>,
 +
W:Time can only ease my woe,<br>
 +
W: Since the lad of my heart from me did depart,<br>
 +
W:Slan mavourneen, slan, slan.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:2. Then I'll sell my rock and I'll sell my wheel,<br>
 +
W: To buy my love a sword of steel,<br>
 +
W:That every battle he might win,<br>
 +
W: Slan manourneen, slan, slan.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: 3. I wish I was on yonder hill,<br>
 +
W:I'd sit me down and cry my fill;<br>
 +
W: Every tear might turn a mill,<br>
 +
W:Slan, mavourneen, slan, slan.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:4. Then round my petticoats I wear red,<br>
 +
W: Oft times my parents wish that I was dead,<br>
 +
W:As through the world I beg my bread,<br>
 +
W: Slan, mavourneen, slan, slan.<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
M:4/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:G<br>
 +
"^Dorian" AB | c4 B4 | AGEF G4 |$ G3 E G2 B2 | (AG) A2 !fermata!E2 CD | E2 ED (CD) (EF) |$<br>
 +
w: O it's|slan, slan,|slan a- guss- a- roo,|Time can on- ly|ease * my woe, Since the|lad of my heart * from *|<br>
 +
G2 AG E4 | c3 A B2 e2 | A4 A2 |]<br>
 +
w: me did de- part,|Slan mav- our- neen,|slan, slan.|<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/14'' Butterworth remarks that this piece is Dorian, whereas it is, in fact, Hyperdorian. The key signature should thus be G as it is here transcribed, and not C as it appears in the MS.
 
''Notes on GB/6b/14'' Butterworth remarks that this piece is Dorian, whereas it is, in fact, Hyperdorian. The key signature should thus be G as it is here transcribed, and not C as it appears in the MS.
Line 201: Line 663:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:15<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/15 Admiral Benbow<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. Crow, Filby, Norfolk, April 1910<br>
 +
P:Noted by Francis Jekyll and George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:Words not noted. GSKB.<br>
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
Q:1/4=120<br>
 +
M:4/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:G<br>
 +
"^Mixolydian influence" D/E/ =F/D/ | G B A A | G2 A/B/ c | d2 c B | A c B A | G B A G |$<br>
 +
F D G/F/ E | D2 B B/c/ | d B/A/ G G | G B d d | c B A A/F/ |$ D F A A | G3/2 A/ G F | E D B, C |<br>
 +
D c B A | G2 |]<br>
  
  
Line 212: Line 689:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:16<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/16 It's of a Farmer All in this Town<br>
 +
C:Mr. Smith (p. 1), Stoke Lacy, Herefordshire, IX. 07<br>
 +
P:F.W. J(ekyll) & G.S.K. B(utterworth)<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
T:[The Suffolk Miracle]<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:1. It's of a farmer all in this town,<br>
 +
W: His name was up through the country round;<br>
 +
W: He had a daughter, a beauty bright,<br>
 +
W:  And she alone was his heart's delight.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  2. Many a noble lord came this dame to see,<br>
 +
W:  But still she could fancy none of there;<br>
 +
W:  But of late came one of low degree,<br>
 +
W:  He came of late, so she fancied he.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  3. When her father came of this to hear,<br>
 +
W:  He separated her from her dear;<br>
 +
W:  Three score miles he did her send,<br>
 +
W:  To her uncle's house, to her discontent.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  4. One night as she was for her bed bound,<br>
 +
W:  She heard a noise and a dismal sound;<br>
 +
W:  Saying, "Mary dear, rise from your bed,<br>
 +
W:  ...............................<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: 5. "Here is a token, my heart's delight,<br>
 +
W:  "Your father's steed to ride home this night;<br>
 +
W:  "Another token I've brought to you,<br>
 +
W:  "Your mother's cloak, and her silk coat too."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: 6. They rode more quickly than the wind,<br>
 +
W:  But still he minded his love behind;<br>
 +
W:  He heaved a sigh and thus did say,<br>
 +
W:  "Oh my dearest dear, how my head does ache."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  7. At length they came to her father's gate,<br>
 +
W:  And these few words to his love he said,<br>
 +
W:  "Alight, my love, and go to your bed,<br>
 +
W:  "Your father's steed I'll see combed and fed."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  8. A white holland handkerchief she drew,<br>
 +
W:  And bound it round his head, and tightly too;<br>
 +
W:  She went up to her father's hall,<br>
 +
W:  Loudly for her father she did call.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  9. "Oh father dear, did you send for me,<br>
 +
W:  "By my loved Jimmy, kind sir?" said she;<br>
 +
W:  It's well he knew this young man was dead,<br>
 +
W:  Which made every hair stand up on his head.<br>
 +
W:
 +
W:  10. This young man's darling cried more and more,<br>
 +
W:  Thus young man was dead just nine months or more<br>
 +
W:  The grave was opened where he was laid,<br>
 +
W:  With his love's holland handkerchief bound round his head.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: Butterworth adds: Mrs Whiting also sang this tune,<br>
 +
W: practically without variation. The words printed<br>
 +
W: consist of fragments given by the singers. They<br>
 +
W: should be compared with 'The Suffolk Miracle'<br>
 +
W: (Oxford Book of Ballads).<br>
 +
W:                                            GSKB<br>
 +
W: Anne Gilchrist adds: See Child's Popular Ballads,<br>
 +
W: under 'The Suffolk Miracle', for full notes on this ballad,<br>
 +
W: "the representative in England of one of the most remarkable<br>
 +
W: tales and one of the most impressive and beautiful ballads<br>
 +
W: of the European continent".<br>
 +
W:                                            AGG<br>
 +
W: Lucy Broadwood adds: To the editor: I hope a sub-title,<br>
 +
W: 'The Suffolk Miracle' will be added for reference purposes.<br>
 +
W:                                            LEB<br>
 +
W: (Full English Editorial note: No suitable replacement for<br>
 +
W: the missing line has been found in Child, Bronson or the<br>
 +
W: Oxford Book of Ballads. However, the text  "And come with<br>
 +
W: me," her true love said. will fit perfectly well for performance.<br>                                                    SF)
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
Q:1/4=120<br>
 +
M:3/2<br>
 +
I:linebreak $
 +
K:Daeo<br>
 +
"^Aeolian" (D/E/) | F G F2 A, A, | C D C3 G |$ G E C2 F3/2 G/ | A G A3 C | F E F2 F G |$<br>
 +
w: It's *|of a farm- er all|in this town, His|name was up through the|count- ry round; He|had a daugh- ter, a|<br>
 +
A G (A d-) d d | (A/G/) A F2 D3/2 E/ | D D D3 |]<br>
 +
w: beaut- y bright, _ _ And|she * a- lone was his|heart's de- light.|<br>
  
  
Line 223: Line 786:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:17<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/17 The Tinker<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. James Landamore, Wroxham, Norfolk, April 1910<br>
 +
P:Noted by Francis Jekyll and George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:Butterworth comments: Words not noted. GSKB This tune is very similar to ´Bridgwater Fair'<br>
 +
W: (Folksongs from Somerset). An anonymous note in the file comments: To Mr Keel This seems<br>
 +
W: to be an old country dance air. A lively tune of the same character is sung in Scotland to the<br>
 +
W: "Tinkler's Waddin'", written by William Watt (1792 to 1859). There may have been a dance tune<br>
 +
W: by that name (the Tinker) to which Watt's song was written.<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=120<br>
 +
M:6/8<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:Fmix<br>
 +
C2 D | E2 E C2 D | EDE C3 | F=EF GAB | A2 G !fermata!F2 G | c2 B c2 A | BAG c2 B |$ c2 F F2 G |<br>
 +
F2 E C2 D | EDE C2 D | EDE C3 | F=EF GAB | AGA F3 |]<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/17'' This is a version of "The Tinker's Courtship." For a fuller version with copious notes on it see p.103 and p. 141 of Frank Purslow's "The Constant Lovers."
 
''Notes on GB/6b/17'' This is a version of "The Tinker's Courtship." For a fuller version with copious notes on it see p.103 and p. 141 of Frank Purslow's "The Constant Lovers."
Line 236: Line 817:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:18<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/18 Little Brown Jug<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. Smith, at Stoke Lacy, Hereford, September 1907<br>
 +
P:Noted by Francis Jekyll and George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:1. Me and my wife we live alone<br>
 +
W: In a neat little cottage we calls our own<br>
 +
W: She likes gin and I likes rum<br>
 +
W:  And that's where we has lots of fun.<br>
 +
W:  Singing old brown ale, old brown beer,<br>
 +
W:  The bonny little brown jug that I loves dear.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  2. If I had a cow that would give such milk<br>
 +
W:  I would dress her up in the finest silk<br>
 +
W:  I would feed her up on the best of hay<br>
 +
W: I would milk her nine times every day. Singing...etc.<br>
 +
W:<br> 
 +
W:3. Then it's if my brown jug was in gaol<br>
 +
W:  I'd pawn my shirt and bring it out on bail;<br>
 +
W:  And if my wife would me despise<br>
 +
W:  I'd up with my fists and give her two black eyes. Singing...etc.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  4. Then in comes the landlord, so noble and fat<br>
 +
W:  He puts on his three-cocked hat<br>
 +
W:  He fills your beer till the cellar runs dry<br>
 +
W:  And he wouldn't care a damn if you live or die. Singing...etc.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  5. The brewer brews it into a pan<br>
 +
W:  The landlord spills it into a can<br>
 +
W:  He fills your beer till the cellar runs dry<br>
 +
W:  And he wouldn't care a damn if you live or die. Singing...etc.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:Frank Kidson remarks: Is this a Folk-Song? JFK To which Lucy Broadwood responds: No! LEB<br>
 +
W: Kidson then adds the following note: Little Brown Jug This is not a folk song. It is an American<br>
 +
W: production which came to England about 1880. A copy will be found the 'The Scottish Student's<br>
 +
W: Song Book' and other places. It is said to be by R. A. Eastburn. Frank Kidson<br>
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
Q:1/4=120<br>
 +
M:4/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:G<br>
 +
"^Dorian" (B3/2 A/) | G E E (B,/C/) | D D D D/ D/ | E E/ E/ G/ G/ A |$ B A A2 | B B d B |<br>
 +
w: Me *|and my wife we *|lives a- lone In a|neat lit- tle cot- tage we|calls our own,|She likes gin and|<br>
 +
A A A (G/A/) |$ B B (B/A/) G | A A B B/ A/ | G E E2 |$ D D D3/2 D/ | G/ A/ B/ c/ d B/ A/ |<br>
 +
w: I likes rum, And *|that's where we * has|lots of fun, Sing- ing|old brown ale,|old brown beer, The|bon- ny lit- tle brown jug that|<br>
 +
G E E2 |]<br>
 +
w: I loves dear.|<br>
  
  
Line 247: Line 877:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:19<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/19 Horse Racing Song<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. "Blue" Fisher, Tidenham, Norfolk, December 1911<br>
 +
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:1. It's of three north noble country dukes from the Newmarket came<br>
 +
W: All for a wager they did run, and the riders to do the same,<br>
 +
W: The same, the same, and the riders to do the same.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  2. And as they were a-riding along the road, they met with a little boy<br>
 +
W:  "Come show to me Lord Framplin's halls that his horses we may see."<br>
 +
W:  May see, may see, etc.<br>
 +
W:
 +
W:  3. Then he took them into his middlemost stable, among those riders all<br>
 +
W:  There was great Greasy-heel, little Lamp-boy Jack, little Molly shall run with you all.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: 4. Then up bespoke the poorest duke, the poorest of those three<br>
 +
W:  "I'll run you for thirty thousand pounds, and tomorrow shall be the day."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  5. So when Lord Framplin heard those words, he stood with his hat in his hand<br>
 +
W:  "I'll run you for gold whilst gold shall hold, and I'll make it upon your land."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  6. Then the drums and the trumpets we did sound, all for them to get ready<br>
 +
W:  And all Lord Frampton had to say, "Mind you, Jack boy, and be steady."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: 7. The first milepost he did come at, Lord Thompson's man did say:<br>
 +
W:  "If you can't go no faster than this, kind sir, I'll show you the way."<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  8. The second milepost he did come at, the people all declared<br>
 +
W:  They hardly could decide the case between the horse and the mare.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  9. There was heel to heel and toe to toe, so merrily they did run on,<br>
 +
W:  They were shoulder to shoulder and flank to flank, and the whip and touch began.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  10. And just as they did climb the hill, Lord Framplin's mare being free<br>
 +
W:  She took to her heels and away did run, and Lord Framplin he carried the day.<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=120<br>
 +
M:4/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:Bb<br>
 +
F2 | B2 B2 B2"^(a)" dc | c2 F2 !fermata!F2 F2 | B2 B2 (Bc) (de) |$ f6 (fe) |<br>
 +
w: 1.~It's|of three north nob- le|coun- try dukes from|the New- mar- * ket *|came, All *|<br>
 +
d2 (dc) B2"^(b)" (BA) | G2"^(c)" B2 F2 FF | GA B2 d2"^(d)" e2 |$[M:3/2] B4 G4 F2 F F |<br>
 +
w: for a * wa- ger *|they did run, and the|rid- ers to do the|same, the same, and the|<br>
 +
[M:4/4] GA"^(e)" B2 d2 (ec) | B6 ||$ F2 | B2 B2 B2"^(a) var." d2 | c2 F2 !fermata!F2 F2 |<br>
 +
w: rid- ers to do the *|same.||||<br>
 +
B2 B2 (Bc) (de) |$ f6 (fe) | d2 (dc) B2"^(b) var." B2 | G2"^(c) var." (BG) F2 FF |<br>
 +
w: ||||<br>
 +
GA B2 d2"^(d) var." (ec) |$[M:3/2] B4 G4 F2 F F |[M:4/4] GA"^(e) var." (Bc) d2 (ec) | B6 |]<br>
 +
w: ||||<br>
  
  
Line 258: Line 941:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:20<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/20 Royal George<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. Robert Hurr, Southwold, Suffolk, October 24th, 1910<br>
 +
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:1. As we set sail from [for?] the rock of Gibraltar,<br>
 +
W: As we set sail from sweet Dublin Bay,<br>
 +
W: O little did we think of our sad mis fortune,<br>
 +
W:  A-sleeping in the briny sea,<br>
 +
W:  O little did we think of our sad misfortune,<br>
 +
W:  A-sleeping in the brin-y sea.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  2. O there was one poor woman a-living in the city<br>
 +
W:  As soon as she heard that her husband was dead<br>
 +
W:  It filled her [?] poor heart full of grief and pity<br>
 +
W:  To hear what that poor woman said,<br>
 +
W:  It filled...etc.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  3. She said, "I'll go and seek for my own true lover,<br>
 +
W:  "I'll go and sail the wide world round,<br>
 +
W:  "Then if my own true lover I do not discover,<br>
 +
W:  "All in some salt seas I will drown."<br>
 +
W:  Then if...etc.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:Take 6 Editorial note: See also GB/6b/23 The Wreck of the Royal George; the two songs are perhaps linked.<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=100<br>
 +
M:4/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:Bb<br>
 +
(Bc) | d2 d2 d2 c3/2 d/ |"^(a)" (e>d) c3/2 B/ (B<A) G2- |[M:2/4] G3 d |<br>
 +
w: As _|we set sail from~[for?] the|rock _ of Gib- ral- * tar,|_ As|<br>
 +
[M:4/4] e3 (d/e/)"^(b)" f2 B F |$ A2 B2 !fermata!c3 F | B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F |<br>
 +
w: we set _ sail from sweet|Dub- lin Bay, O|lit- tle did we think _ of our|<br>
 +
(B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d |"^(c)" e2- (3e(fg) f3 e |$ d2 c2"^(d)" (B>A) (G>F) |<br>
 +
w: sad _ mis- for- tune, A-|sleep- * ing _ in the|brin- y sea, _ O _|<br>
 +
B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F | (B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d | e2- (3e(fg) f3 e | d2 c2 B2 ||$ (Bc) |<br>
 +
w: lit- tle did we think _ of our|sad _ mis- for- tune, A-|sleep- * ing _ in the|brin- y sea.||<br>
 +
d2 d2 d2 c3/2 d/ |"^(a) var." (ed) c B (B<A) G2- |[M:2/4] G3 d |<br>
 +
w: |||<br>
 +
[M:4/4] e3 (d/e/)"^(b) var." f3 B |$ B3/2 A/ B2 !fermata!c3 F | B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F |<br>
 +
w: |||<br>
 +
(B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d |"^(c) var." e2 (fg) f3 e |$ d2 c2"^(d) var." (BA) (GF) |<br>
 +
w: |||<br>
 +
B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F | (B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d | e2- (3e(fg) f3 e | d2 c2 B2 |]<br>
 +
w: ||||<br>
  
  
Line 269: Line 1,000:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:22<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/22 As Robin Was Driving<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. 'Blue' Fisher, Tidenham, Norfolk, December 1911<br>
 +
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:Butterworth adds: The rest of the words are not suitable for publication. GSKB<br>
 +
W: (Take 6 Editorial note: The words will, however, be found on p.8 of<br>
 +
W: "The Ploughboy's Glory", edited by Michael Dawney and published by the EFDSS  - SF)<br>
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
Q:1/4=120<br>
 +
M:3/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:Ador<br>
 +
"^Dorian" ((A/B/)) | c B A |"^(a)" B E E |"^(b)" c B G | A2 (A/B/) | c A A |$ G E E/E/ | F D D |<br>
 +
w: As *|Ro- bin was|driv- ing his|wag- on a-|long, The *|trees in full|blos- som and the|birds in full|<br>
 +
E2 B | c B A | B E E |$ c B G | A2 (A/B/) | c A A | G E (E/"^?"F/) | G G A | E2 (D/C/) |$<br>
 +
w: song, I|saw a young|dam- sel was|going to and|fro, As *|Ro- bin was|driv- ing his *|wag- on gee-|ho, That's *|<br>
 +
(C3/2 D/) (E/"^?"F/) | G !fermata!E2 | (c B) A | G E D | E A"^#?" G | A2 ||$ ((A/B/)) | c B A |<br>
 +
w: well * done *|Ro- bin,|Drive * on,|Ro- bin, ride|up and gee-|ho.|||<br>
 +
"^(a) var." G E E |"^(b) var." c B (A/"^?#"G/) | A2 (A/B/) | c A A |$ G E E/E/ | F D D | E2 B |<br>
 +
w: |||||||<br>
 +
c B A | B E E |$ c B G | A2 (A/B/) | c A A | G E (E/"^?"F/) | G G A | E2 (D/C/) |$<br>
 +
w: ||||||||<br>
 +
(C3/2 D/) (E/F/) | G !fermata!E2 | (c B) A | G E D | E A"^#?" G | A2 |]<br>
 +
w: ||||||<br>
  
  
Line 280: Line 1,038:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:23<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/23 The Wreck of the Royal George<br>
 +
C:Sung by W. Wickham, Blackham, Sussex, May, 1907.<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:(I noted it in G.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W: Full English Editorial note: This song was not collected by Butterworth, but by Annie Gilchrist, who wrote a letter<br>
 +
W: that was attached to GB/6b/20. Her letter was subsequently annoted by Lucy Broadwood. For reasons of space,<br>
 +
W: the text is quoted here, rather than with GB/6b/20. Royal George To Mr Keel: I do not think this is properly a<br>
 +
W: folk-song - at any rate as regards the tune. I obtained what appears to be the chorus from a young labourer in<br>
 +
W: Sussex in 1907. He had learnt it "from other men" - very likely in camp, as he had been a volunteer and had learnt<br>
 +
W: other songs in a similar way. I doubt whether the tune is even as old as the time of the loss of the Royal George<br>
 +
W: (1782). The phrase "little did we think of our sad misfortune" certainly has quite a modern ring. I can't account<br>
 +
W: for the "fourteen hundred men, women and children" - some other wreck seems to have got mixed up with the<br>
 +
W: Royal George! A.G.G. I don't think we should print this. It does not seem to me to be anything other than a<br>
 +
W: reminiscence of a quite late 18th Century composed story.<br>                                                                                                                        LEB
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
Q:1/4=110<br>
 +
M:4/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:Bb<br>
 +
"^Chorus (in marching time)" !>!B !>!B !>!B !>!B | d (3c/ c/ B/ A3/4 G/4 F | f f g f/ d/ |<br>
 +
w: Four- teen hun- dred|men, wo- men and chil- der- en,|On- ly four of them|<br>
 +
B d c3/2 F/ |$ B3/4 c/4 d3/4 c/4 B F |[M:5/4] A B (c/>d/) !fermata!e f/ d/ |<br>
 +
w: reached the shore (And)|all the Roy- al George and|all its glo- * ries They went|<br>
 +
[M:4/4] e (3(d/ c/) B/ c f | B2 z2 |]<br>
 +
w: down and * was seen no|more.|<br>
  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/23'' This was collected not by Butterworth but by Annie Gilchrist. See GB-6b-23.pdf for more information.  
 
''Notes on GB/6b/23'' This was collected not by Butterworth but by Annie Gilchrist. See GB-6b-23.pdf for more information.  
Line 293: Line 1,080:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:24<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/24 [O Madam I'll Present You]<br>
 +
T:[The Keys of Heaven] 1st Version<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. Woods, Tidenham, Norfolk, December 1911<br>
 +
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:1. O Madam I'll present you a fine coach and six,<br>
 +
W: Four black horses as black as any jet,<br>
 +
W: If you will walk abroad with me,<br>
 +
W:  If you will walk abroad with me.<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  2. O I won't accept your fine coach and six, (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  3. O Madam I'll present you a fine easy chair,<br>
 +
W:  To set in the garden and take the morning air, If you... (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  4. O I won't accept... (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  5. O Madam I'll present you a fine silken gown,<br>
 +
W:  Four yards long all a-trailed on the ground,<br>
 +
W:  If you... (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  6. O I won't accept... (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:7. O Madam I'll present you a fine gold watch,<br>
 +
W:  To hang by your side to tell you what's the time,<br>
 +
W: If you... (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  8. O I won't accept... (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  9. O Madam I'll present you the key of my chest,<br>
 +
W:  And all my gold jewels and jewels I possess,<br>
 +
W:  If you... (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  10. O I won't accept... (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  11. O Madam I'll present you the key of my heart,<br>
 +
W:  And married we will be and never never part,<br>
 +
W:  If you... (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:  12. O I will accept... (etc.)<br>
 +
W:<br>
 +
W:Lucy Broadwood has annotated this ms, first by crossing out Butterworth's title of "The Keys of Heaven"<br>
 +
W: and writing in "No! it isn't - LEB" and she adds a the following note: Please don't call this 'The Keys of<br>
 +
W: Heaven' which don't come into this version & is merely the title of my particular version in 'County Songs'<br>
 +
W: which does turn on the Keys of Heaven. "Madam I present you" is the title that usually covers this class of song.<br>                                                                                        LEB If any songs are to be omitted I should leave this out as the song is in most nursery-rhyme books in similar versions (Halliwell, Chambers, etc.etc.etc.)<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=120<br>
 +
M:4/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:G<br>
 +
D2 | G G G G G2 B A | G2 D D D4 |$ A2 A2 A2 G A | B d c A B3 G | B3 G A3 F |$ G2 B2 D2 z B |<br>
 +
w: O|Ma dam, I'll pre- sent you a|fine coach and six,|Four black hor- ses as|black as an- y jet, If|you will walk a-|broad with me, If|<br>
 +
c B A G D2 F2 | G6 |]<br>
 +
w: you will walk a- broad with|me.|<br>
  
  
Line 306: Line 1,150:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:25<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/25 [O Madam I'll Present You]<br>
 +
T: [The Keys of Heaven] 2nd Version<br>
 +
C:Sung at Fernhurst, Sussex<br>
 +
P:Noted by Francis Jekyll<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
Q:1/4=110<br>
 +
M:4/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:G<br>
 +
G | DG GG G2 GG | A>B cA B2 BA | GGGF E2 FG | A3/2 B/ A G GF Bd |$[M:3/4] d4 d2 | B4 AG |<br>
 +
[M:4/4] G2 B2 D2 z D | EFGA B2 A2 | G6 |]<br>
  
  
Line 322: Line 1,180:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:27<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/27 The Banks of Green Willow Version 2 of 4<br>
 +
T:Second Version<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. Cornford, East Chiltington, July 1908<br>
 +
P:Noted by George Butterworth<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
M:3/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:A<br>
 +
A>B | c2 A2 B2 | A>G E>F =G>A | F>E D>F A2 | A2 E2 (3EF=G |$ A3 =G E>D | B,>C D2 D>D | E2 B3 E |<br>
 +
FG A2 |]<br>
  
  
Line 333: Line 1,204:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:28<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/28 The Banks of Green Willow Version 3 of 4<br>
 +
T:The following tune comes from the collection of the late Mr. Hammond. R.V.W.<br>
 +
C:Sung by Mr. J. Welsh, Wareham (Dorset)<br>
 +
P:Noted by H.E.D. Hammond<br>
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
L:1/4<br>
 +
M:3/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:G<br>
 +
G | B G B | A F D | E3/2 F/ G/ E/ |"^(a)" D B, B, |$ G G B,/ B,/ | C E B,/ C/ | D c B | A G ||$ G |
 +
w: 'Tis|of a sea|cap- tain who|lived near the sea-|side (o) he|court a fam- ous|daught- er that he|once love so|dear- ly.|Come|<br>
 +
B/ >A/ G B | A/ >F/ D G/ F/ | E C A/ F/ | (G/>F/) D D |$ G G B, |"^(b)" C E B,/C/ | D c B | A G ||$<br>
 +
w: toll the bell come|toll the bell oh come|toll it loud and|eas- * i- ly|||||<br>
 +
G | B G B | A F D | E3/2 F/ G/E/ |"^(a) var." D/C/ B, D |$ G G B, | C B, B,/C/ | D c B | A G ||$<br>
 +
w: |||||||||<br>
 +
G | B/>A/ G B | A/>F/ D G/F/ | E C A/F/ | G/>F/ D D |$ G G B, |"^(b) var." C B, B,/C/ | D c B |<br>
 +
w: ||||||||<br>
 +
A G |]<br>
 +
w: |<br>
  
  
Line 344: Line 1,236:
  
 
'''abc notation'''
 
'''abc notation'''
 +
 +
X:29<br>
 +
T:GB/6b/29 The Banks of Green Willow Version 4 of 4<br>
 +
T:The Merchant's Daughter [Bonnie Annie]<br>
 +
C:As sung in Aberdeenshire in his childhood<br>
 +
P:Noted by the Rev. J.K. Maconachie
 +
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones<br>
 +
L:1/8<br>
 +
M:4/4<br>
 +
I:linebreak $<br>
 +
K:D<br>
 +
D | F2 D >D D2 E F |$ d2 e d B A2 A | d2 c >B A2 D >E |$ F2 A >F E D2 :|<br>
 +
w: There|was a rich mer- chant who|lived in Dum- bar- ton, And|he had a daugh- ter whose|name was called An- nie.|<br>
 +
w: Whose|name was called An- ie, whose|name was called An- nie, And|he had a daugh- ter whose|name was called An- nie.|<br>

Latest revision as of 14:46, 20 April 2016

Link to Take 6 Transcription Programme Home Page


For playback, abc files, and midi files, of these transcriptions that are linked to their original MSS enter the filenames [LEB/2/1/1 or whatever] in the search box here. [[1]]


GB/6b/1 All Round My Hat Version 1 of 2

File:GB-6b-1.mid

File:GB-6b-1.pdf

File:GB-6b-1.xml

abc notation

X:1
T:GB/6a/1 All Round My Hat Version 1 of 3
C:Sung by Mr. Edmund Knight, Washington, December 1907
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:1. Come all you young people,
W: and listen to my ditty,
W: I'll tell you how young Phoebe
W: accused young William wrong;
W: She said he had deceived her,
W: it sadly seemed to grieve her.
W: Left alone one evening
W: she sang a mournful song.
W:
W: 2. "Young men are false,
W: they are so deceitful,
W: "Young men are false,
W: they seldom do prove true;
W: "Rambling and ranging,
W: their minds are always changing,
W: "They are always seeking
W: for some young girl that's new.
W:
W: 3. "Many a long hour
W: have I spent in courting,
W: "Many a long hour
W: have I spent in vain;
W: "But since it is my fortune
W: that I must die a maiden,
W: "Never will I ramble
W: so far, far again.
W: W: 4. "O if I had but
W: my own heart to keep it,
W: "O if I had but
W: my own heart again,
W: "How closely in my bosom
W: I would lock it up for ever,
W: "And never would I ramble
W: so far, far again.
W:
W: 5. "All round my hat
W: I will wear the green willow,
W: "All round my hat
W: for twelve months and a day;
W: "If anyone should ask me
W: the reason why I wear it,
W: "I will tell them that my true love
W: is far, far away."
W:
W: 6. "O Phoebe, O Phoebe,
W: since for me you have lamented,
W: "You will find in the end
W: you'll have no cause to rue;
W: "For since I've found you faithful,
W: come make yourself contented,
W: "For all that I said was
W: to try if you was true."
W:
W: 7. Now William and Phoebe
W: in wedlock are united,
W: They live in a cottage
W: down by the riverside;
W: Let us hope that their comfort
W: and peace will ne'er be blighted,
W: Young lovers take example
W: by William and his bride.
L:1/8
Q:1/4=100
M:6/8
I:linebreak $
K:Gmix
"^Key signature of G in MS is here changed to C (G Mixolydian) to eliminate accidentals. The tune is unaltered. " D |
w: Come|
G3 (AG) F | G3 (AB) c | d2 d (ed) c | (d2 c) A2 A |$ G2 G (AG) F | G3 (AB) c | d2 d (ed) c |
w: all you * young|peo- ple * and|lis- ten to * my|dit- * ty, I'll|tell you how * young|Phoe- be * ac-|cused young Wil- * liam|
d3- d2 d |$ (de) c c2 e | (d2 c) A2 B | c2 A d2 G | (G2 F) D3 |$ G2 G (AG) F | G3 (AB) c |
w: wrong. * She|said * he had de-|ceived * her, it|sad- ly seemed to|grieve * her;|Left a- lone * one|eve- ning * she|
d2 d c2 B | G3- G2 |]
w: sang a mourn- ful|song. *|

Notes on GB/6b/1 The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/1 and GB/7a/70. In the MS the version sung by Mr. Verrall at Horsham in July 1909 (GB/7a/71) is appended to this version but crossed out.


GB/6b/2 All Round My Hat Version 2 of 2

File:GB-6b-2.mid

File:GB-6b-2.pdf

File:GB-6b-2.xml

abc notation

X:2
T:GB/6b/2 All Round My Hat Version 3 of 3
T:The following variant is from the collection of the late Mr. Hammond
C:Sung by Mrs. Crawford, West Milton (Dorset)
P:Noted by H.E.D. Hammond
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:1. Yesterday evening I was invited to a wedding
W: Unto a fair girl that provèd so unkind.
W: As soon as she began for to think on some other
W: The farmer, her own lovyer, still runs in her mind.
W:
W: 2. When supper was over and all things were ended
W: They all did conclude to give the bride a song.
W: The first that begun was the farmer, her own lovyer,
W: To give the bride a song, but it was not very long.
W:
W: 3. "O how can you sleep on another man's pillow
W: "Since you pretend that you love me so dear?
W: "Now for your sweet sake I'll wear a mournful willow
W: "Now and for ever I'll wear it for my dear."
W:
W: 4. (Omitted.)
W:
W: 5. The favour was granted and all things were ready
W: With sighing and crying they all went to bed.
W: 'Twas early one morning the young man arosèd
W: He went and he found that his new wife was dead.
W:
W: 6. (See above.)
W:
T:RVW (Ralph Vaughan Williams)
L:1/8
Q:1/4=100
M:6/8
I:linebreak $
K:D
"_(Last Verse)" D3 (ED) C | D3"^(a)" d2 c | B2 c d2 B | B3 A3 | B3 (Bc) d | F3 E2 D |$
w: All round * my|hat I will|wear the mourn- ful|will- ow|All round * my|hat for a|
E2 E (EF) G | F3- F2 A | (B2 A) B2 c | d2 c d2 B | A3 (G2 E) | F2 D A,2 A, |$ D2 D E2 E |
w: twelve- month and * a|day, * And|if * this here|will- ow it should|not be- *|come me Then I'll|leave it off for|
F3 d2 B | (A2 F)"^(b)" (G2 E) |"_(Last Verse)" D6 || D3 (ED) C | D3"^(a) var." A2 A | B2 c d2 B |$
w: ev- er and|e- * ver *|more.|All round * my|hat I will|wear the mourn- ful|
B3 A3 | B3 (Bc) d | F3 E2 D | E2 E (EF) G | F3- F2 A | (B2 A) B2 c |$ d2 c d2 B | A3 (G2 E) |
w: will- ow|All round * my|hat for a|twelve- month and * a|day, * And|if * this here|will- ow it should|not be- *|
F2 D A,2 A, | D2 D E2 E | F3 d2 B | (A2 F)"^(b) var." (GFE) | D6 |]
w: come me Then I'll|leave it off for|ev- er and|e- * ver * *|more.|


GB/6b/3 Highland Jane

File:GB-6b-3.mid

File:GB-6b-3.pdf

File:GB-6b-3.xml

abc notation

X:3
T:GB/6b/3 Highland Jane
T:I have noted the following variant of this song. R.V.W.
C:Sung by Mr. Burrage, "Rushetts," Rushetts Farm, near Capel, Surrey, August 1908
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
L:1/8
M:3/4
I:linebreak $
K:Faeo
z A/B/ | cF F3 F | A/B/c B2 A>B | cf"^(a)" e2 c>B | AG F2 :|
$ c>d | ef e2 A>c | ef e3 f | fe cd/c/ BA | Bc FEFG |
$ AB"^(b)" c3 E | Ac B2 A>B | cf ec/B/ AG | F4 |
$|: A/B/ | cF F3 F | A/B/c B2 A>B |[M:2/4]"^(a) var." cf e/d/c/B/ |[M:3/4] AG F2 :|
$ z2 | c>d | ef e2 A>c | ef e3 f | fe cd/c/ BA | Bc FEFG |
$ AB"^(b) var." F3 E | Ac B2 A>B | cf ec/B/ AG | F4 |]


GB/6b/4 The Banks of Green Willow Version 1 of 4

File:GB-6b-4.mid

File:GB-6b-4.pdf

File:GB-6b-4.xml

abc notation

X:4
T:GB/6b/4 The Banks of Green Willow Version 2 of 4
T:Second Version
C:Sung by Mr. Cornford, East Chiltington, July 1908
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
L:1/8
M:3/4
I:linebreak $
K:A
A>B | c2 A2 B2 | A>G E>F =G>A | F>E D>F A2 | A2 E2 (3EF=G |$ A3 =G E>D | B,>C D2 D>D | E2 B3 E |
FG A2 |]

Notes on GB/6b/4 In the Take 6 Catalogue this version is also entered as GB/6b/26. For versions 2-4 see GB/6b/27-9 below.


GB/6b/5 The Bonny Bunch of Roses

File:GB-6b-5.mid

File:GB-6b-5.pdf

File:GB-6b-5.xml

abc notation

X:5
T:GB/6b/5 The Bonny Bunch of Roses
C:Sung by Mr. and Mrs. Cranstone, Billingshurst, June 1907
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
L:1/8
Q:1/4=80
M:4/4
I:linebreak $
K:Cdor
"^DORIAN" G G | c3 d e2 d2 | (c3 B) G2 z G |$ c3 d e2 d2 | c2 (B=A) G2 G2 | c3 B G2 (FE) |$
w: By the|dan- gers of the|O- * cean, One|morn- ing in the|month of * June, The|feath- ered warb- ling *|
(F2 G2) C2 (DE) | F2 (G=A) (BA) (GF) | G2 C2 C2 |]
w: song * sters Their *|charm- ing * notes * so *|sweet did tune.|

Notes on GB/6b/5 The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/36 and GB/7b/4B.


GB/6b/6 On Christmas Night (Carol) Version 1 of 2

File:GB-6b-6.mid

File:GB-6b-6.pdf

File:GB-6b-6.xml

abc notation

X:6
T:GB/6b/6 On Christmas Night (Carol)
T:First Version
C:Sung by Mr George Knight, Horsham. April 1907
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:1. On Christmas night all Christians sing
W: To hear what news the angels bring.
W: News of great joy and news of mirth,
W: News of our merciful Saviour's birth.
W:
W:
W: 2. There's kings of kings, of earth and heaven,
W: There's kings of angels and of men.
W: Angels and men with joy may sing,
W: To hear what news the angels bring.
W:
W: 3. For out of darkness we have light,
W: Which makes all Christians sing this night.
W: Pris'ners all in their chains rejoice,
W: To hear the echo of a voice.
L:1/4
Q:1/4=126
M:6/4
I:linebreak $
K:C
E | G2 G F2 F | E2 E (D C) B, | C2 C (D E) F |$ E2 D C3 | E3 D2 C | (D E) F (G F) E | D6 |
w: On|Christ- mas night all|Christ- ians sing, _ To|hear what news _ the|an- gels bring.|News of great|joy _ and news _ of|mirth,|
G3 A3 |$ (G2 E) F3 | G3 C2 C | D E F E2 D | C3- C2 |]
w: News of|News _ of,|News of our|mer- ci- ful Sav- iour's|birth _|

Notes on GB/6b/6 The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/125 and GB/7a/56.


GB/6b/7 On Christmas Night (Carol) Version 2 of 2

File:GB-6b-7.mid

File:GB-6b-7.pdf

File:GB-6b-7.xml

abc notation

X:7
T:GB/6b/7 On Christmas Night (Carol)
T:Version 2 of 2
C:Sung by Mrs Cranstone, Billingshurst, June 1907
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
L:1/4
M:6/4
I:linebreak $
K:Cmix
"^Mixolydian" C | D2 (C D) E F | G2 G D2 C | D2 C (D E) F | G2 G D3 |$ G2 B A3 | G3 (F E) D |
G2 G C2 C | D E F E2 D | (C3 C2) |]

Notes on GB/6b/7 The tune is identical to that of GB/7a/57. See also GB/6a/126. For words to this carol see GB/6b/6 above. In the MS there is this note relevant to this Version 2: "The words belong to the first version. Mrs. Cranstone could only remember fragments. G.S.K.B(utterworth)."


GB/6b/8 The Cruel Father and Affectionate Lovers

File:GB-6b-8.mid

File:GB-6b-8.pdf

File:GB-6b-8.xml

abc notation

X:8
T:GB/6b/8 The Cruel Father and Affectionate Lovers
C:Sung by Mr. George Knight, Horsham, April 1907
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:Under the title here given the song is often found on broadsides.
W: It is included in the Journal, Vol. i No. 4, p.220, Vol. ii No. 7
W: pp. 97 and 98 and Vol. iii No. 13, p. 294, with many references
W: of interest. A Surrey version with the tune harmonised is in
W: English Traditional Songs and Carols under the title "The Young
W: Servant Man" or "Two Affectionate Lovers". - L.E.B.
W:
L:1/4
Q:1/4=100
M:5/4
I:linebreak $
K:G
D | G E D G G | A A A B (B/c/) |[M:3/2] d d c2 (B3/2 G/) |$[M:5/4] A A G2 D/ D/ | G E D G G/ G/ |
w: It's|of a dam- sel both|fair and hand- some. These *|lines are true as *|I've been told. By the|banks of Shan- non in a|
A A A B (B/c/) |$[M:3/2] d d c2 (B3/2 G/) |[M:5/4] A A G2 B | c d e c A |$[M:3/2] B c d B z d |
w: lof- ty man- sion her *|fath- er claimed great *|store of gold. Her|hair was black as a|rav- en's fea- ther, Her|
[M:5/4] c B A G E | F G D2 D |$ G E D G G | A A A B (B/c/) |[M:3/2] d d c2 B3/2 G/ | A A G3 |]
w: form and fea- tures des-|cribe who can? But|since it's fol- ly be-|longs to nat- ure, She *|fell in love with a|ser- vant man.|

Notes on GB/6b/8 The tune is similar to those of GB/6a/56 and GB/7a/76.


GB/6b/9 Johnny Harte

File:GB-6b-9.mid

File:GB-6b-9.pdf

File:GB-6b-9.xml

abc notation

X:9
T:GB/6b/9 Johnny Harte
C:Sung by Mr. Smith, at Stoke Lacy, Hereford, September 1907
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:Rest of words not noted - GSKB
L:1/8
Q:1/4=100
M:6/8
I:linebreak $
K:Ddor
"^Dorian" C | D2 D G2 G | (A2 B) c2 E | G2 E E2 D | C3- C2 C |$ D D D G2 G | (A2 B) c2 E |
w: It's|of a High- land|sol- * dier lived|in the town of|Ross, _ He|court- ed a farm- er's|daugh- * ter, His|
F D E D2 D | D3- D2 G |$ A2 G (AB) c | d3 c2 A | G2 E E2 D | C3- C2 C |$ D2 D G2 G | (A2 B) c2 E |
w: name it was John- ny|Harte, _ For|six long months * they|court- ed, her|par- ents they know|not _ He|was their daugh- ter's|sweet * heart, dress'd|
F D E D2 D | D3- D2 |]
w: up in his ug- ly|plaid. _|

Notes on GB/6b/9 The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/29.


GB/6b/10 A Lawyer Fine and Gay Second Version

File:GB-6b-10.mid

File:GB-6b-10.pdf

File:GB-6b-10.xml

abc notation

X:10
T:GB/6b/10 A Lawyer Fine and Gay
T:Second Version
C:Sung by Mrs. Cranstone, Billingshurst, July 1907
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:(Editor's note: Words are given to this tune in the original MS but then crossed out,
W: presumably by Butterworth himself. See GB/6b/10 for words to fit.)
L:1/8
Q:1/4=100
M:6/8
I:linebreak $
K:C
G | c2 c (cB) A | (GE) G C2 C | c2 d (ed) c |[M:9/8] (A2 B) c3 c2 d |$ e d c d3 c3 |
A G A (E2 D) C2 G |[M:6/8] G E G (GE) G | (A2 B) c2 |]

Notes on GB/6b/10 The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/25. For the First Version see GB/6b/11 immediately below.


GB/6b/11 A Lawyer Fine and Gay First Version

File:GB-6b-11.mid

File:GB-6b-11.pdf

File:GB-6b-11.xml

abc notation

X:11
T:GB/6b/11 A Lawyer Fine and Gay
T:First Version
C:Sung by Mrs. Verrall, Horsham, 1908
P:Noted by Francis Jekyll
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:1. It's of a lawyer fine and gay,
W: Went riding through some city;
W: It was there he espied a fair pretty maid;
W: She was handsome and tall and pretty.
W:
W: 2. "May I go with you, my pretty maid?"
W: He asked her so dearly;
W: "You can do as you please, kind sir," she said,
W: "But my father is there a-mowing."
W:
W: 3. This lawyer he got off his horse,
W: Thinking that he might gain her,
W: When she took such a fright right over the way,
W: Thinking he might undo her.
W:
W: 4. This lawyer ran like any deer,
W: Till he did overtake her,
W: When all that he whispered in her ear
W: Was what a fine lady he'd make her.
W:
W: 5. "I will take you up to fair London town,
W: "And all such lovely places,
W: "I will busk you into a silken gown,
W: "Gold rings and gold chains and gold laces."
W:
W: 6. "I will have none of your silken gowns,
W: "Nor go to none of your fine places.
W: "I'll never be busked in a silken gown,
W: "Gold rings nor gold chains nor gold laces."
W:
W: 7. "I never will be a lawyer's wife,
W: "To live in a house of ruin;
W: "I would rather be a poor man's wife.
W: "My husband loves me dearly."
W:
W: 8. "I would rather be a poor man's wife.
W: "My husband loves me dearly,
W: "And between us both we manage to keep
W: "A poor little innocent baby."
W:
W: Note the Aeolian cadence in this otherwise purely Ionian (or major) tune - R.V.W.
W:
W:Is this the original of "Mowing the barley" now so much sung?
W: As "Oh where beese gwying" a version can be seen in Rev. G. Hill's
W: "Wiltshire Folk Songs and Carols".
W: - D. K.
W:See also the note by Cecil Sharp prefacing GB/6B/11A - Ed.
L:1/8
Q:1/4=120
M:6/8
I:linebreak $
K:C
E | A2 B c2 A | G2 E C2 G | c2 d e2 c |$[M:9/8] (B2 c) d3 c2 d | e e c d3 (c2 B) |$
w: It's|of a law- yer|fine and gay, Went|rid- ing through some|ci- * ty, It was|there he es- pied a _|
A B c (E2 D) C2 D |[M:6/8] E E E E2 D | (A2 G) A2 ||
w: fair pret- ty maid, _ She was|hand- some and tall and|pret- * ty.|

Notes on GB/6b/11 The tune is similar to that of GB/7b/25. For the Second Version see GB/6b/10 immediately above.


GB/6b/11A [A Lawyer Fine and Gay]

File:GB-6b-11A.mid

File:GB-6b-11A.pdf

File:GB-6b-11A.xml

abc notation

X:11A
T:GB/6b/11A [A Lawyer Fine and Gay]
C:Sung by Mrs. Elizabeth Handy at Ilmington, Warwickshire, April 1911
P:Noted by Cecil Sharp
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:The following is the last stanza of a Warwickshire version. The rest of the words are not substantially
W: different from the above* set. C. J. S.
W:
  W:* i.e. GB/6b/11 - Ed.
L:1/8
Q:1/4=120
M:6/8
I:linebreak $
K:D
A | d2 A B2 G | A2 C D2 A | d d e f2 d | (B2 c) d2 d |$ f2 f (ed) c | (Bc) d F2 D | w: I'd|ra- ther be a|poor man's wife and|sit at my wheel a-|spin- * ning Than|I would be _ a|law- * yer's wife, They|
(DF) A (AG) F | (A2 d) d2 |]
w: are _ the worst _ of|wo- * men.|


GB/6b/12 The Mistress Health

File:GB-6b-12.mid

File:GB-6b-12.pdf

File:GB-6b-12.xml

abc notation

X:12
T:GB/6b/12 The Mistress' Health GB/6b/13 [The Great Bell of Lincoln]
C:Sung by Mr. George Knight, Horsham, April 1907
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:Butterworth also adds the following: To the tune of the above, Mr Knight sang also the following health song:-
W:
W: The Great Bell of Lincoln is broken in her frame,
W: And she must be mended before she rings again,
W: With new frame and new wheel, new clipper and new strings,
W: O turn the bell over, hark, hark, how she rings.
W:
W: The last line refers to the reversing of the drinking horns
W: after the health is drunk. GSKB
W:
W: The following note was appended by Anne Gilchrist to the above:
W: This tune has a considerable resemblance to the old tune 'Jack
W: Jintle' and also to 'The Jacket and the Petticoat' (Miss Mason's
W: Nursery Rhymes) - a tune belonging to an eighteenth (?) century
W: song called 'Nothing at All'. AGG
L:1/4
Q:1/4=100
M:3/4
I:linebreak $
K:C
C/ C/ F F | G E C | C A A | A2 c |$ G G G | G E C | C A A | A2 G |$ E G G | c G E | F G A |
w: Now we've drunk our|mas- ter's health,|We'll drink our|dame's, And|we will be|mer- ry in|do- ing the|same: To|him we drank|one glass, To|her we'll drink|
c2 A |$ G E C | F D D | E C C | C3 |]
w: two, And|we will be|mer- ry be-|fore we do|go.|

Notes on GB/6b/12 The files for GB/6b/12 are identical to those for GB/6b/13. (Please refer to the MSS or to the PDF.)


GB/6b/13 [The Great Bell of Lincoln]

File:GB-6b-13.mid

File:GB-6b-13.pdf

File:GB-6b-13.xml

abc notation

X:13
T:GB/6b/12 The Mistress' Health GB/6b/13 [The Great Bell of Lincoln]
C:Sung by Mr. George Knight, Horsham, April 1907
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:Butterworth also adds the following: To the tune of the above, Mr Knight sang also the following health song:-
W:
W: The Great Bell of Lincoln is broken in her frame,
W: And she must be mended before she rings again,
W: With new frame and new wheel, new clipper and new strings,
W: O turn the bell over, hark, hark, how she rings.
W:
W: The last line refers to the reversing of the drinking horns
W: after the health is drunk. GSKB
W:
W: The following note was appended by Anne Gilchrist to the above:
W: This tune has a considerable resemblance to the old tune 'Jack
W: Jintle' and also to 'The Jacket and the Petticoat' (Miss Mason's
W: Nursery Rhymes) - a tune belonging to an eighteenth (?) century
W: song called 'Nothing at All'. AGG
L:1/4
Q:1/4=100
M:3/4
I:linebreak $
K:C
C/ C/ F F | G E C | C A A | A2 c |$ G G G | G E C | C A A | A2 G |$ E G G | c G E | F G A | w: Now we've drunk our|mas- ter's health,|We'll drink our|dame's, And|we will be|mer- ry in|do- ing the|same: To|him we drank|one glass, To|her we'll drink|
c2 A |$ G E C | F D D | E C C | C3 |]
w: two, And|we will be|mer- ry be-|fore we do|go.|

Notes on GB/6b/13 The files for GB/6b/13 are identical to those for GB/6b/12. (Please refer to the MSS or to the PDF.)


GB/6b/14 Shule Agra

File:GB-6b-14.mid

File:GB-6b-14.pdf

File:GB-6b-14.xml

abc notation

X:14
T: GB/6b/14 Shule Agra
C: Sung by Mr. Smith at Stoke Lacy, Hereford, September 1907
P: Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W: 1. O it's slan, slan, slan agussaroo
, W:Time can only ease my woe,
W: Since the lad of my heart from me did depart,
W:Slan mavourneen, slan, slan.
W:
W:2. Then I'll sell my rock and I'll sell my wheel,
W: To buy my love a sword of steel,
W:That every battle he might win,
W: Slan manourneen, slan, slan.
W:
W: 3. I wish I was on yonder hill,
W:I'd sit me down and cry my fill;
W: Every tear might turn a mill,
W:Slan, mavourneen, slan, slan.
W:
W:4. Then round my petticoats I wear red,
W: Oft times my parents wish that I was dead,
W:As through the world I beg my bread,
W: Slan, mavourneen, slan, slan.
L:1/8
M:4/4
I:linebreak $
K:G
"^Dorian" AB | c4 B4 | AGEF G4 |$ G3 E G2 B2 | (AG) A2 !fermata!E2 CD | E2 ED (CD) (EF) |$
w: O it's|slan, slan,|slan a- guss- a- roo,|Time can on- ly|ease * my woe, Since the|lad of my heart * from *|
G2 AG E4 | c3 A B2 e2 | A4 A2 |]
w: me did de- part,|Slan mav- our- neen,|slan, slan.|

Notes on GB/6b/14 Butterworth remarks that this piece is Dorian, whereas it is, in fact, Hyperdorian. The key signature should thus be G as it is here transcribed, and not C as it appears in the MS.


GB/6b/15 Admiral Benbow

File:GB-6b-15.mid

File:GB-6b-15.pdf

File:GB-6b-15.xml

abc notation

X:15
T:GB/6b/15 Admiral Benbow
C:Sung by Mr. Crow, Filby, Norfolk, April 1910
P:Noted by Francis Jekyll and George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:Words not noted. GSKB.
L:1/4
Q:1/4=120
M:4/4
I:linebreak $
K:G
"^Mixolydian influence" D/E/ =F/D/ | G B A A | G2 A/B/ c | d2 c B | A c B A | G B A G |$
F D G/F/ E | D2 B B/c/ | d B/A/ G G | G B d d | c B A A/F/ |$ D F A A | G3/2 A/ G F | E D B, C |
D c B A | G2 |]


GB/6b/16 It's Of A Farmer All In This Town

File:GB-6b-16.mid

File:GB-6b-16.pdf

File:GB-6b-16.xml

abc notation

X:16
T:GB/6b/16 It's of a Farmer All in this Town
C:Mr. Smith (p. 1), Stoke Lacy, Herefordshire, IX. 07
P:F.W. J(ekyll) & G.S.K. B(utterworth)
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
T:[The Suffolk Miracle]
W:
W:1. It's of a farmer all in this town,
W: His name was up through the country round;
W: He had a daughter, a beauty bright,
W: And she alone was his heart's delight.
W:
W: 2. Many a noble lord came this dame to see,
W: But still she could fancy none of there;
W: But of late came one of low degree,
W: He came of late, so she fancied he.
W:
W: 3. When her father came of this to hear,
W: He separated her from her dear;
W: Three score miles he did her send,
W: To her uncle's house, to her discontent.
W:
W: 4. One night as she was for her bed bound,
W: She heard a noise and a dismal sound;
W: Saying, "Mary dear, rise from your bed,
W: ...............................
W:
W: 5. "Here is a token, my heart's delight,
W: "Your father's steed to ride home this night;
W: "Another token I've brought to you,
W: "Your mother's cloak, and her silk coat too."
W:
W: 6. They rode more quickly than the wind,
W: But still he minded his love behind;
W: He heaved a sigh and thus did say,
W: "Oh my dearest dear, how my head does ache."
W:
W: 7. At length they came to her father's gate,
W: And these few words to his love he said,
W: "Alight, my love, and go to your bed,
W: "Your father's steed I'll see combed and fed."
W:
W: 8. A white holland handkerchief she drew,
W: And bound it round his head, and tightly too;
W: She went up to her father's hall,
W: Loudly for her father she did call.
W:
W: 9. "Oh father dear, did you send for me,
W: "By my loved Jimmy, kind sir?" said she;
W: It's well he knew this young man was dead,
W: Which made every hair stand up on his head.
W: W: 10. This young man's darling cried more and more,
W: Thus young man was dead just nine months or more
W: The grave was opened where he was laid,
W: With his love's holland handkerchief bound round his head.
W:
W: Butterworth adds: Mrs Whiting also sang this tune,
W: practically without variation. The words printed
W: consist of fragments given by the singers. They
W: should be compared with 'The Suffolk Miracle'
W: (Oxford Book of Ballads).
W: GSKB
W: Anne Gilchrist adds: See Child's Popular Ballads,
W: under 'The Suffolk Miracle', for full notes on this ballad,
W: "the representative in England of one of the most remarkable
W: tales and one of the most impressive and beautiful ballads
W: of the European continent".
W: AGG
W: Lucy Broadwood adds: To the editor: I hope a sub-title,
W: 'The Suffolk Miracle' will be added for reference purposes.
W: LEB
W: (Full English Editorial note: No suitable replacement for
W: the missing line has been found in Child, Bronson or the
W: Oxford Book of Ballads. However, the text "And come with
W: me," her true love said. will fit perfectly well for performance.
SF) L:1/4
Q:1/4=120
M:3/2
I:linebreak $ K:Daeo
"^Aeolian" (D/E/) | F G F2 A, A, | C D C3 G |$ G E C2 F3/2 G/ | A G A3 C | F E F2 F G |$
w: It's *|of a farm- er all|in this town, His|name was up through the|count- ry round; He|had a daugh- ter, a|
A G (A d-) d d | (A/G/) A F2 D3/2 E/ | D D D3 |]
w: beaut- y bright, _ _ And|she * a- lone was his|heart's de- light.|


GB/6b/17 The Tinker

File:GB-6b-17.mid

File:GB-6b-17.pdf

File:GB-6b-17.xml

abc notation

X:17
T:GB/6b/17 The Tinker
C:Sung by Mr. James Landamore, Wroxham, Norfolk, April 1910
P:Noted by Francis Jekyll and George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:Butterworth comments: Words not noted. GSKB This tune is very similar to ´Bridgwater Fair'
W: (Folksongs from Somerset). An anonymous note in the file comments: To Mr Keel This seems
W: to be an old country dance air. A lively tune of the same character is sung in Scotland to the
W: "Tinkler's Waddin'", written by William Watt (1792 to 1859). There may have been a dance tune
W: by that name (the Tinker) to which Watt's song was written.
L:1/8
Q:1/4=120
M:6/8
I:linebreak $
K:Fmix
C2 D | E2 E C2 D | EDE C3 | F=EF GAB | A2 G !fermata!F2 G | c2 B c2 A | BAG c2 B |$ c2 F F2 G |
F2 E C2 D | EDE C2 D | EDE C3 | F=EF GAB | AGA F3 |]

Notes on GB/6b/17 This is a version of "The Tinker's Courtship." For a fuller version with copious notes on it see p.103 and p. 141 of Frank Purslow's "The Constant Lovers."


GB/6b/18 Little Brown Jug

File:GB-6b-18.mid

File:GB-6b-18.pdf

File:GB-6b-18.xml

abc notation

X:18
T:GB/6b/18 Little Brown Jug
C:Sung by Mr. Smith, at Stoke Lacy, Hereford, September 1907
P:Noted by Francis Jekyll and George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:1. Me and my wife we live alone
W: In a neat little cottage we calls our own
W: She likes gin and I likes rum
W: And that's where we has lots of fun.
W: Singing old brown ale, old brown beer,
W: The bonny little brown jug that I loves dear.
W:
W: 2. If I had a cow that would give such milk
W: I would dress her up in the finest silk
W: I would feed her up on the best of hay
W: I would milk her nine times every day. Singing...etc.
W:
W:3. Then it's if my brown jug was in gaol
W: I'd pawn my shirt and bring it out on bail;
W: And if my wife would me despise
W: I'd up with my fists and give her two black eyes. Singing...etc.
W:
W: 4. Then in comes the landlord, so noble and fat
W: He puts on his three-cocked hat
W: He fills your beer till the cellar runs dry
W: And he wouldn't care a damn if you live or die. Singing...etc.
W:
W: 5. The brewer brews it into a pan
W: The landlord spills it into a can
W: He fills your beer till the cellar runs dry
W: And he wouldn't care a damn if you live or die. Singing...etc.
W:
W:Frank Kidson remarks: Is this a Folk-Song? JFK To which Lucy Broadwood responds: No! LEB
W: Kidson then adds the following note: Little Brown Jug This is not a folk song. It is an American
W: production which came to England about 1880. A copy will be found the 'The Scottish Student's
W: Song Book' and other places. It is said to be by R. A. Eastburn. Frank Kidson
L:1/4
Q:1/4=120
M:4/4
I:linebreak $
K:G
"^Dorian" (B3/2 A/) | G E E (B,/C/) | D D D D/ D/ | E E/ E/ G/ G/ A |$ B A A2 | B B d B |
w: Me *|and my wife we *|lives a- lone In a|neat lit- tle cot- tage we|calls our own,|She likes gin and|
A A A (G/A/) |$ B B (B/A/) G | A A B B/ A/ | G E E2 |$ D D D3/2 D/ | G/ A/ B/ c/ d B/ A/ |
w: I likes rum, And *|that's where we * has|lots of fun, Sing- ing|old brown ale,|old brown beer, The|bon- ny lit- tle brown jug that|
G E E2 |]
w: I loves dear.|


GB/6b/19 Horse Racing Song

File:GB-6b-19.mid

File:GB-6b-19.pdf

File:GB-6b-19.xml

abc notation

X:19
T:GB/6b/19 Horse Racing Song
C:Sung by Mr. "Blue" Fisher, Tidenham, Norfolk, December 1911
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:1. It's of three north noble country dukes from the Newmarket came
W: All for a wager they did run, and the riders to do the same,
W: The same, the same, and the riders to do the same.
W:
W: 2. And as they were a-riding along the road, they met with a little boy
W: "Come show to me Lord Framplin's halls that his horses we may see."
W: May see, may see, etc.
W: W: 3. Then he took them into his middlemost stable, among those riders all
W: There was great Greasy-heel, little Lamp-boy Jack, little Molly shall run with you all.
W:
W: 4. Then up bespoke the poorest duke, the poorest of those three
W: "I'll run you for thirty thousand pounds, and tomorrow shall be the day."
W:
W: 5. So when Lord Framplin heard those words, he stood with his hat in his hand
W: "I'll run you for gold whilst gold shall hold, and I'll make it upon your land."
W:
W: 6. Then the drums and the trumpets we did sound, all for them to get ready
W: And all Lord Frampton had to say, "Mind you, Jack boy, and be steady."
W:
W: 7. The first milepost he did come at, Lord Thompson's man did say:
W: "If you can't go no faster than this, kind sir, I'll show you the way."
W:
W: 8. The second milepost he did come at, the people all declared
W: They hardly could decide the case between the horse and the mare.
W:
W: 9. There was heel to heel and toe to toe, so merrily they did run on,
W: They were shoulder to shoulder and flank to flank, and the whip and touch began.
W:
W: 10. And just as they did climb the hill, Lord Framplin's mare being free
W: She took to her heels and away did run, and Lord Framplin he carried the day.
L:1/8
Q:1/4=120
M:4/4
I:linebreak $
K:Bb
F2 | B2 B2 B2"^(a)" dc | c2 F2 !fermata!F2 F2 | B2 B2 (Bc) (de) |$ f6 (fe) |
w: 1.~It's|of three north nob- le|coun- try dukes from|the New- mar- * ket *|came, All *|
d2 (dc) B2"^(b)" (BA) | G2"^(c)" B2 F2 FF | GA B2 d2"^(d)" e2 |$[M:3/2] B4 G4 F2 F F |
w: for a * wa- ger *|they did run, and the|rid- ers to do the|same, the same, and the|
[M:4/4] GA"^(e)" B2 d2 (ec) | B6 ||$ F2 | B2 B2 B2"^(a) var." d2 | c2 F2 !fermata!F2 F2 |
w: rid- ers to do the *|same.||||
B2 B2 (Bc) (de) |$ f6 (fe) | d2 (dc) B2"^(b) var." B2 | G2"^(c) var." (BG) F2 FF |
w: ||||
GA B2 d2"^(d) var." (ec) |$[M:3/2] B4 G4 F2 F F |[M:4/4] GA"^(e) var." (Bc) d2 (ec) | B6 |]
w: ||||


GB/6b/20 Royal George

File:GB-6b-20.mid

File:GB-6b-20.pdf

File:GB-6b-20.xml

abc notation

X:20
T:GB/6b/20 Royal George
C:Sung by Mr. Robert Hurr, Southwold, Suffolk, October 24th, 1910
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:1. As we set sail from [for?] the rock of Gibraltar,
W: As we set sail from sweet Dublin Bay,
W: O little did we think of our sad mis fortune,
W: A-sleeping in the briny sea,
W: O little did we think of our sad misfortune,
W: A-sleeping in the brin-y sea.
W:
W: 2. O there was one poor woman a-living in the city
W: As soon as she heard that her husband was dead
W: It filled her [?] poor heart full of grief and pity
W: To hear what that poor woman said,
W: It filled...etc.
W:
W: 3. She said, "I'll go and seek for my own true lover,
W: "I'll go and sail the wide world round,
W: "Then if my own true lover I do not discover,
W: "All in some salt seas I will drown."
W: Then if...etc.
W:
W:Take 6 Editorial note: See also GB/6b/23 The Wreck of the Royal George; the two songs are perhaps linked.
L:1/8
Q:1/4=100
M:4/4
I:linebreak $
K:Bb
(Bc) | d2 d2 d2 c3/2 d/ |"^(a)" (e>d) c3/2 B/ (B<A) G2- |[M:2/4] G3 d |
w: As _|we set sail from~[for?] the|rock _ of Gib- ral- * tar,|_ As|
[M:4/4] e3 (d/e/)"^(b)" f2 B F |$ A2 B2 !fermata!c3 F | B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F |
w: we set _ sail from sweet|Dub- lin Bay, O|lit- tle did we think _ of our|
(B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d |"^(c)" e2- (3e(fg) f3 e |$ d2 c2"^(d)" (B>A) (G>F) |
w: sad _ mis- for- tune, A-|sleep- * ing _ in the|brin- y sea, _ O _|
B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F | (B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d | e2- (3e(fg) f3 e | d2 c2 B2 ||$ (Bc) |
w: lit- tle did we think _ of our|sad _ mis- for- tune, A-|sleep- * ing _ in the|brin- y sea.||
d2 d2 d2 c3/2 d/ |"^(a) var." (ed) c B (B<A) G2- |[M:2/4] G3 d |
w: |||
[M:4/4] e3 (d/e/)"^(b) var." f3 B |$ B3/2 A/ B2 !fermata!c3 F | B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F |
w: |||
(B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d |"^(c) var." e2 (fg) f3 e |$ d2 c2"^(d) var." (BA) (GF) |
w: |||
B3/2 A/ B3/2 c/ (B>A) G F | (B>A) B2 c !fermata!f2 d | e2- (3e(fg) f3 e | d2 c2 B2 |]
w: ||||


GB/6b/22 As Robin Was Driving

File:GB-6b-22.mid

File:GB-6b-22.pdf

File:GB-6b-22.xml

abc notation

X:22
T:GB/6b/22 As Robin Was Driving
C:Sung by Mr. 'Blue' Fisher, Tidenham, Norfolk, December 1911
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:Butterworth adds: The rest of the words are not suitable for publication. GSKB
W: (Take 6 Editorial note: The words will, however, be found on p.8 of
W: "The Ploughboy's Glory", edited by Michael Dawney and published by the EFDSS - SF)
L:1/4
Q:1/4=120
M:3/4
I:linebreak $
K:Ador
"^Dorian" ((A/B/)) | c B A |"^(a)" B E E |"^(b)" c B G | A2 (A/B/) | c A A |$ G E E/E/ | F D D |
w: As *|Ro- bin was|driv- ing his|wag- on a-|long, The *|trees in full|blos- som and the|birds in full|
E2 B | c B A | B E E |$ c B G | A2 (A/B/) | c A A | G E (E/"^?"F/) | G G A | E2 (D/C/) |$
w: song, I|saw a young|dam- sel was|going to and|fro, As *|Ro- bin was|driv- ing his *|wag- on gee-|ho, That's *|
(C3/2 D/) (E/"^?"F/) | G !fermata!E2 | (c B) A | G E D | E A"^#?" G | A2 ||$ ((A/B/)) | c B A |
w: well * done *|Ro- bin,|Drive * on,|Ro- bin, ride|up and gee-|ho.|||
"^(a) var." G E E |"^(b) var." c B (A/"^?#"G/) | A2 (A/B/) | c A A |$ G E E/E/ | F D D | E2 B |
w: |||||||
c B A | B E E |$ c B G | A2 (A/B/) | c A A | G E (E/"^?"F/) | G G A | E2 (D/C/) |$
w: ||||||||
(C3/2 D/) (E/F/) | G !fermata!E2 | (c B) A | G E D | E A"^#?" G | A2 |]
w: ||||||


GB/6b/23 The Wreck of the Royal George

File:GB-6b-23.mid

File:GB-6b-23.pdf

File:GB-6b-23.xml

abc notation

X:23
T:GB/6b/23 The Wreck of the Royal George
C:Sung by W. Wickham, Blackham, Sussex, May, 1907.
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:(I noted it in G.)
W:
W: Full English Editorial note: This song was not collected by Butterworth, but by Annie Gilchrist, who wrote a letter
W: that was attached to GB/6b/20. Her letter was subsequently annoted by Lucy Broadwood. For reasons of space,
W: the text is quoted here, rather than with GB/6b/20. Royal George To Mr Keel: I do not think this is properly a
W: folk-song - at any rate as regards the tune. I obtained what appears to be the chorus from a young labourer in
W: Sussex in 1907. He had learnt it "from other men" - very likely in camp, as he had been a volunteer and had learnt
W: other songs in a similar way. I doubt whether the tune is even as old as the time of the loss of the Royal George
W: (1782). The phrase "little did we think of our sad misfortune" certainly has quite a modern ring. I can't account
W: for the "fourteen hundred men, women and children" - some other wreck seems to have got mixed up with the
W: Royal George! A.G.G. I don't think we should print this. It does not seem to me to be anything other than a
W: reminiscence of a quite late 18th Century composed story.
LEB L:1/4
Q:1/4=110
M:4/4
I:linebreak $
K:Bb
"^Chorus (in marching time)" !>!B !>!B !>!B !>!B | d (3c/ c/ B/ A3/4 G/4 F | f f g f/ d/ |
w: Four- teen hun- dred|men, wo- men and chil- der- en,|On- ly four of them|
B d c3/2 F/ |$ B3/4 c/4 d3/4 c/4 B F |[M:5/4] A B (c/>d/) !fermata!e f/ d/ |
w: reached the shore (And)|all the Roy- al George and|all its glo- * ries They went|
[M:4/4] e (3(d/ c/) B/ c f | B2 z2 |]
w: down and * was seen no|more.|

Notes on GB/6b/23 This was collected not by Butterworth but by Annie Gilchrist. See GB-6b-23.pdf for more information.


GB/6b/24 [O Madam I'll Present You] [The Keys of Heaven] Version 1 of 2

File:GB-6b-24.mid

File:GB-6b-24.pdf

File:GB-6b-24.xml

abc notation

X:24
T:GB/6b/24 [O Madam I'll Present You]
T:[The Keys of Heaven] 1st Version
C:Sung by Mr. Woods, Tidenham, Norfolk, December 1911
P:Noted by R. Vaughan Williams and George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
W:
W:1. O Madam I'll present you a fine coach and six,
W: Four black horses as black as any jet,
W: If you will walk abroad with me,
W: If you will walk abroad with me.
W:
W: 2. O I won't accept your fine coach and six, (etc.)
W:
W: 3. O Madam I'll present you a fine easy chair,
W: To set in the garden and take the morning air, If you... (etc.)
W:
W: 4. O I won't accept... (etc.)
W:
W: 5. O Madam I'll present you a fine silken gown,
W: Four yards long all a-trailed on the ground,
W: If you... (etc.)
W:
W: 6. O I won't accept... (etc.)
W:
W:7. O Madam I'll present you a fine gold watch,
W: To hang by your side to tell you what's the time,
W: If you... (etc.)
W:
W: 8. O I won't accept... (etc.)
W:
W: 9. O Madam I'll present you the key of my chest,
W: And all my gold jewels and jewels I possess,
W: If you... (etc.)
W:
W: 10. O I won't accept... (etc.)
W:
W: 11. O Madam I'll present you the key of my heart,
W: And married we will be and never never part,
W: If you... (etc.)
W:
W: 12. O I will accept... (etc.)
W:
W:Lucy Broadwood has annotated this ms, first by crossing out Butterworth's title of "The Keys of Heaven"
W: and writing in "No! it isn't - LEB" and she adds a the following note: Please don't call this 'The Keys of
W: Heaven' which don't come into this version & is merely the title of my particular version in 'County Songs'
W: which does turn on the Keys of Heaven. "Madam I present you" is the title that usually covers this class of song.
LEB If any songs are to be omitted I should leave this out as the song is in most nursery-rhyme books in similar versions (Halliwell, Chambers, etc.etc.etc.)
L:1/8
Q:1/4=120
M:4/4
I:linebreak $
K:G
D2 | G G G G G2 B A | G2 D D D4 |$ A2 A2 A2 G A | B d c A B3 G | B3 G A3 F |$ G2 B2 D2 z B |
w: O|Ma dam, I'll pre- sent you a|fine coach and six,|Four black hor- ses as|black as an- y jet, If|you will walk a-|broad with me, If|
c B A G D2 F2 | G6 |]
w: you will walk a- broad with|me.|


GB/6b/25 [O Madam I'll Present You] [The Keys of Heaven] Version 2 of 2

File:GB-6b-25.mid

File:GB-6b-25.pdf

File:GB-6b-25.xml

File:GB-6b-25-Specimen setting.pdf

abc notation

X:25
T:GB/6b/25 [O Madam I'll Present You]
T: [The Keys of Heaven] 2nd Version
C:Sung at Fernhurst, Sussex
P:Noted by Francis Jekyll
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
L:1/8
Q:1/4=110
M:4/4
I:linebreak $
K:G
G | DG GG G2 GG | A>B cA B2 BA | GGGF E2 FG | A3/2 B/ A G GF Bd |$[M:3/4] d4 d2 | B4 AG |
[M:4/4] G2 B2 D2 z D | EFGA B2 A2 | G6 |]


GB/6b/26 The Banks of Green Willow Version 1 of 4 (Duplicate)

Notes on GB/6b/26 See GB/6b/4 and the Notes to it.


GB/6b/27 The Banks of Green Willow Version 2 of 4

File:GB-6b-27.mid

File:GB-6b-27.pdf

File:GB-6b-27.xml

abc notation

X:27
T:GB/6b/27 The Banks of Green Willow Version 2 of 4
T:Second Version
C:Sung by Mr. Cornford, East Chiltington, July 1908
P:Noted by George Butterworth
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
L:1/8
M:3/4
I:linebreak $
K:A
A>B | c2 A2 B2 | A>G E>F =G>A | F>E D>F A2 | A2 E2 (3EF=G |$ A3 =G E>D | B,>C D2 D>D | E2 B3 E |
FG A2 |]


GB/6b/28 The Banks of Green Willow Version 3 of 4

File:GB-6b-28.mid

File:GB-6b-28.pdf

File:GB-6b-28.xml

abc notation

X:28
T:GB/6b/28 The Banks of Green Willow Version 3 of 4
T:The following tune comes from the collection of the late Mr. Hammond. R.V.W.
C:Sung by Mr. J. Welsh, Wareham (Dorset)
P:Noted by H.E.D. Hammond
Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
L:1/4
M:3/4
I:linebreak $
K:G
G | B G B | A F D | E3/2 F/ G/ E/ |"^(a)" D B, B, |$ G G B,/ B,/ | C E B,/ C/ | D c B | A G ||$ G | w: 'Tis|of a sea|cap- tain who|lived near the sea-|side (o) he|court a fam- ous|daught- er that he|once love so|dear- ly.|Come|
B/ >A/ G B | A/ >F/ D G/ F/ | E C A/ F/ | (G/>F/) D D |$ G G B, |"^(b)" C E B,/C/ | D c B | A G ||$
w: toll the bell come|toll the bell oh come|toll it loud and|eas- * i- ly|||||
G | B G B | A F D | E3/2 F/ G/E/ |"^(a) var." D/C/ B, D |$ G G B, | C B, B,/C/ | D c B | A G ||$
w: |||||||||
G | B/>A/ G B | A/>F/ D G/F/ | E C A/F/ | G/>F/ D D |$ G G B, |"^(b) var." C B, B,/C/ | D c B |
w: ||||||||
A G |]
w: |


GB/6b/29 The Banks of Green Willow Version 4 of 4

File:GB-6b-29.mid

File:GB-6b-29.pdf

File:GB-6b-29.xml

abc notation

X:29
T:GB/6b/29 The Banks of Green Willow Version 4 of 4
T:The Merchant's Daughter [Bonnie Annie]
C:As sung in Aberdeenshire in his childhood
P:Noted by the Rev. J.K. Maconachie Z:Transcribed by Simon Furey and Lewis Jones
L:1/8
M:4/4
I:linebreak $
K:D
D | F2 D >D D2 E F |$ d2 e d B A2 A | d2 c >B A2 D >E |$ F2 A >F E D2 :|
w: There|was a rich mer- chant who|lived in Dum- bar- ton, And|he had a daugh- ter whose|name was called An- nie.|
w: Whose|name was called An- ie, whose|name was called An- nie, And|he had a daugh- ter whose|name was called An- nie.|